Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a form with 2 fields, one of which is required. I used HTML5 required attribute to check if the field is filled up during submission.

<form id ='reg' name='reg' action='here.php' method='post'>
    <input type='text' id='name' name='name' placeholder='Name' value='' required="true" />
    <input type='text' id='contactno' name='contactno' placeholder='Contact No' value='' />
    <input type='submit' value='Register' name='register' id='register' /> 
</form>

Before the form actually submits, I want to show a confirm box (using alertify jQuery plugin) to prompt the user for a submission. If a user clicks OK, the form should submit. Otherwise, it should not. I used this code for the confirm box checking once the submit event fires:

$("#reg").submit(function() 
{
    alertify.confirm("Are you sure you want to commit your reservation?", function (e) 
    {
        if (e) {
            // user clicked "ok"
            alertify.success("You've confirmed your reservation.");
            return true;
        } else {
            // user clicked "cancel"
            alertify.error("You did not confirm your reservation.");
            return false;
        }
    });
});

Problem is, the form doesn't wait for the user's answer and submits immediately. I tried the suggestion here, which seems ok at first. I replaced the html button type to 'button' and replaced the jquery code to this:

$("#register").click(function() 
{
    alertify.confirm("Are you sure you want to commit your reservation?", function (e) 
    {
        if (e) {
            // user clicked "ok"
            alertify.success("You've confirmed your reservation.");
            $("#reg").submit();
            return true;
        } else {
            // user clicked "cancel"
            alertify.error("You did not confirm your reservation.");
            return false;
        }
    });
});

The problem with this one is that I have a required='true' attribute for one of the fields, which should prevent the form from submitting if the field is empty. The code above allows submission if the user clicks OK in the confirmation box even if the required field is still empty.

I want to check first if the field is filled up before it shows the dialog, then wait for the user's answer and then decide whether to submit it or not. Any suggestions on how I could get this working? Thanks in advance! :)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

prevent submit always, then manually submit the form on clicking ok.

$("#reg").submit(function(event){
    event.preventDefault(); // cancel submit
    alertify.confirm("Are you sure you want to commit your reservation?", function (e) {
        if (e) {
            // user clicked "ok"
            alertify.success("You've confirmed your reservation.");
            $("#reg")[0].submit(); // submit form skipping jQuery bound handler
        } else {
            // user clicked "cancel"
            alertify.error("You did not confirm your reservation.");
        }
    });
});

Also changed to a submit event rather than click as that's actually what you want, otherwise the required attribute is useless.

You rarely ever need to use a click event on a submit button. Just bind to the form's submit event.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! Exactly what I needed. –  galibee Aug 20 '13 at 17:52
    
Sorry to dredge this up... but I tried this and I am not getting the form to submit if the "ok" button is pressed. I tried it with and without the [0] and I even shoved another event.preventDefault(); in after the $("#reg")[0].submit(); line. Everything else is working, it just won't submit the form and redirect to the action="whatever.php" page to handle the processings. –  Abela Jan 15 at 6:46
    
If you can produce a fiddle showing the issue I'll look at it in the morning. –  Kevin B Jan 15 at 6:47
    
seems like this is as basic of a form as necessary: jsfiddle.net/wf7jhb9j –  Abela Jan 15 at 8:17
    
never name a submit button "submit". Never name anything the same name of a domNode method or property. –  Kevin B Jan 15 at 15:48

I modified the example above to reduce the boilerplate. No need for the bounds check override anymore. Just pass the event and message to the generic confirm() method.

$(document).ready(function () {

    function confirm(event, msg) {
        var evt = event;
        event.preventDefault();
        alertify.confirm(msg, function (e) {
            if (e) {
                evt.currentTarget.submit();
                return true;
            } else {
                return false;
            }
        });
    }

    $("#deleteApplianceForm").submit(function(event){
        confirm(event, "Are you sure you want to delete this appliance?");
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.