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Just getting started writing Go code and I ran into an interesting problem.

Is there a way to easily iterate over the items in an array that is brought in as an empty interface without code duplication? Consider the following:

function(someArr interface{}){
  switch someArr.(type){
    case []int :
        arr := (someArr).([]int)
        for i := range (arr) {
          // CODE
        }

    case []string :
        arr := (someArr).([]string)
        for i := range (arr) {
          // CODE
        }
  } 
}

In this example the code in CODE is exactly the same. However, I cannot take it out of the switch because the type assertion arr would fall out of scope. Similarly, I can't define arr before the switch because I don't know what type it will be. It's possible that this just cannot be done. In that case, what's a better idiom for this kind of thing when I'm, say, parsing JSON with an irregular schema (some arrays of ints, some arrays or strings)?

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you can modify shorten that a little. switch arr := someArr.(type) {; case []int:; for i := range arr { ... } ... } –  Jeremy Wall Aug 20 '13 at 22:15
    
This is a nice cleanup. I will do this going forward. –  Erik Hinton Aug 21 '13 at 2:03
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2 Answers

You can use the reflect package to iterate over arbitrary slices. But implementing the special cases (like []int) explicitly is generally faster and is often done in addition to avoid reflection in common cases.

package main

import "fmt"
import "reflect"

func foo(values interface{}) {
    rv := reflect.ValueOf(values)
    if rv.Kind() != reflect.Slice {
        return
    }
    n := rv.Len()
    for i := 0; i < n; i++ {
        value := rv.Index(i).Interface()
        fmt.Println(value)
    }
}

func main() {
    foo([]int{1, 3, 3, 7})
}

Edit: I'm not sure why somebody has down voted the question and my answer, but there are cases where you need to deal with code like that. Even the standard library contains plenty of it, take a look at "fmt", "gob", "json", "xml" and "template" for example. The questioner might face a similar problem.

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Your example is not idiomatic Go code, even though the idiomatic one lexically seems violating the DRY principle as well.

The key point to understand is that 'x' is a separate, differently typed variable in each type case:

function(someArr interface{}){
        switch x := someArr.(type) {
        case []int:
                for i := range x {
                        // CODE
                }
        case []string:
                for i := range x {
                        // CODE
                }
        }
}
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So, is that to say it is impossible to avoid duplicating the code in "CODE"? Other than the idiomatic note though, this doesn't seem to address the question of code reuse unless there's something I'm missing? But thanks for the tip on idioms! –  Erik Hinton Aug 20 '13 at 20:25
1  
@ErikHinton: Go is a strongly typed language. The "same" code is actually type specific and thus not eligible for any kind of merging. –  zzzz Aug 20 '13 at 20:26
    
Well, that's not necessarily true (that it can't be merged). In Haskell, for instance, (another strongly, statically typed language) you can write typeclass-polymorphic code such that as long as the possible types have acceptable implementations, the same function can operate on them. I suppose I could do something similarly with a generic interface over the array types to make special equality and length methods but that seems cumbersome. –  Erik Hinton Aug 20 '13 at 20:32
    
The above should say "type-polymorphic code such that as long as the possible types share an acceptable typeclass" –  Erik Hinton Aug 20 '13 at 20:39
1  
@ErikHinton: I think the closest you can get to that in Go is typecasting someArr to []interface{}, and then making CODE operate on that. –  Sam Mussmann Aug 20 '13 at 23:35
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