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Our database is setup in a way that for every table, all the columns do not allow nulls. When adding a new record using the entity framework, it becomes very tiresome to put a value for every single property. Basically, I want to avoid this:

var customer = new usr_Customer();        
customer.CUSTNMBR = customerNumber != null ? customerNumber : string.Empty;
customer.MerchantID = merchant.MerchantId != null ? merchant.MerchantId : string.Empty;
customer.SupplyClubID = merchant.SupplyClub != null ? merchant.SupplyClub : string.Empty;
customer.Group01 = merchant.Group01 != null ? merchant.Group01 : string.Empty;

To solve this issue, I want to override the SaveChanges() method, and set a value for every property that is a null. Here is what I have so far:

public override int SaveChanges()
{
    var changeSet = ChangeTracker.Entries();

    if (changeSet != null)
    {
        foreach (var entry in changeSet.Where(c => c.State == EntityState.Added))
        {
            //If entity properties are null, set them to something.
        }
    }
    return base.SaveChanges();

}

At this point, I'm not sure how to proceed, because I don't know EF well enough. I do know that every entity property of type string will need to be set to string.empty, and for every entity property of type int, will need to be set to 0, and so on and so forth. Is this possible, and more importantly, would it make sense to solve my problems with this approach? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
You need reflection. – SLaks Aug 20 '13 at 20:22
    
Sounds like a design problem if the database columns are not nullable AND you are not having any sort of data validation before you got to SaveChanges(). – User Aug 20 '13 at 20:43
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do it directly in the constructor.

In entity framework entity classes are defined as partial. You can extend them and add a constructor or a factory method that does the initialization:

public partial class usr_Customer
{
    public usr_Customer()
    {
        MerchantID = string.Empty;
    }
}

Edit: I added to your code the property initialization through reflection:

public override int SaveChanges()
{
    var changeSet = ChangeTracker.Entries();

    if (changeSet != null)
    {
        foreach (var entry in changeSet.Where(c => c.State == EntityState.Added))
        {
            Type entityType = entry.GetType();
            //Get all the properties
            var properties = entityType.GetProperties();
            foreach(var property in properties)
            {
                var value = property.GetValue(entry);
                //If the property value is null, initialize with a default value
                if(value == null)
                {
                    //Get the default value of the property
                    var defaultValue = Activator.CreateInstance(property.PropertyType);
                    property.SetValue(defaultValue, entry, null);
                }
             }
        }
    }
    return base.SaveChanges();

}

It should work but, maybe, you should handle "special" properties like navigation properties.

share|improve this answer
    
I have too many tables in my database to use this approach. Doing this for every class is not feasible. – broke Aug 20 '13 at 21:23
    
I see. So you need to use reflection like @SLaks already proposed. – Alberto Aug 20 '13 at 21:37
    
What do you mean by "special" properties? – broke Aug 21 '13 at 19:43
    
I mean properties like navigation properties or properties inherited from EntityObject. But you can actually get only the properties of your entity specifying, in the GetProperties method, these binding flags: var properties = entityType.GetProperties(BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | BindingFlags.Public); this ensure that only public properties and declared at the level of the supplied type will be considered. – Alberto Aug 21 '13 at 19:55
    
Good to know. Thanks for the heads up. – broke Aug 22 '13 at 14:45

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