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In my project, I have several enum declarations alike this one;

enum Comparison
{
    LT,     // "<"
    GT,     // ">"
    EQ,     // "=="
    LTEQ,   // "<="
    GTEQ,   // ">="
    NEQ     // "!="
};
enum Arithmetic
{
    ADD,    // "+"
    SUB,    // "-"
    MUL,    // "*"
    DIV,    // "/"
    MOD,    // "%"
};

And I'd like to combine several of these, into a single combined enum, such that;

  • All elements (from the sub-enums) are present in the combined enum.
  • All elements have a unique value (obviously).
  • All elements have consistent value in the combined enum, and the original.

Like this:

enum Comparison
{
    LT,     // "<"
    GT,     // ">"
    EQ,     // "=="
    LTEQ,   // "<="
    GTEQ,   // ">="
    NEQ     // "!="

    ADD,    // "+"
    SUB,    // "-"
    MUL,    // "*"
    DIV,    // "/"
    MOD,    // "%"
};

Also what I'd like to be able to do, is to 'cast' the combined enum, to one of the original ones, given the value in the combined enum only (should be trivial assuming the values are consistent).

An alternative to enum, is a class based solution, where the classes implement the operator int() operator.

Note; I do believe the operator int() is somehow the way to go.

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What happens when two elements have the same value in different enums? –  Jacob Aug 20 '13 at 20:49
    
I'm not explicitly assigning values to any elements, I wanted the compiler to handle it automatically if possible. My current 'fix' is to simply assign the first element in each enum, to the value of the last element in the previous enum (+1). - However I don't find this pleasing at all. –  Skeen Aug 20 '13 at 20:51
    
Why do you wish to have several enums as well as a 'master' enum ? –  Kindread Aug 20 '13 at 20:57
    
Because the enums represent several logical entities, for instance; comparison operators, keywords, delimiters and such. - However for the lexer I need a unique id for each of element of these entities. –  Skeen Aug 20 '13 at 21:03
    
@Skeen: If you don't explicitly set the values, the compiler isn't really setting it for you. The default is to start at 0 and increment for each new enumeration element. Setting them explicitly gives you the control you are asking for. –  Zac Howland Aug 20 '13 at 21:13
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What I've commonly seen is this:

enum OperationType {
    Comparison = 0x100,
    Arithmetic = 0x200
};        

enum ComparisonType
{
    LT = Comparison,     // "<"
    GT,     // ">"
    EQ,     // "=="
    LTEQ,   // "<="
    GTEQ,   // ">="
    NEQ     // "!="
};
enum ArithmeticType
{
    ADD = Arithmetic,    // "+"
    SUB,    // "-"
    MUL,    // "*"
    DIV,    // "/"
    MOD,    // "%"
};

Which gives you a little more flexibility than simple chaining, because now you can add comparisons without disrupting your Arithmetics, and the Arithmetics and Comparisons don't need to know about eachother. It also becomes trivial to get the type of an enum:

constexpr OperationType getOperationType(unsigned value) {return value&0xFF00;}
share|improve this answer
    
Are there any way to get the number of elements of an enum (on compile time)? –  Skeen Aug 20 '13 at 21:08
    
@Skeen No, you can't. –  Ben Jackson Aug 20 '13 at 21:09
    
@Skeen: With this method, yes, but not easily. You would need to add a "Last###Element" enumeration to each of them, and then sum them up. You could write a function to do that so anyone else who looks at the code won't scratch their head and curse you. However, if that is the kind of functionality you are after, a large single enumeration is really what you want. –  Zac Howland Aug 20 '13 at 21:17
2  
@Skeen: The intent is to make sure each category/type has enough space. There is no way to prevent duplicates, even in a single enum. –  Mooing Duck Aug 20 '13 at 21:21
1  
@Skeen: The best I can think of is this:coliru.stacked-crooked.com/… which I find way uglier and more dangerous than chained enums. On the downside, the values are no longer compile-time constants, so they can't be used in a switch anymore. –  Mooing Duck Aug 20 '13 at 21:40
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A common (but not exceptionally elegant) way to chain enum together (for example if child classes need to extend a unique set) is to have each enum provide a "last" value and use it to start the next:

enum Comparison
{
    LT,     // "<"
    ...
    NEQ,    // "!="
    LastComparison
};

enum Logical
{
    AND = LastComparison,
    OR,
    ...
    LastLogical
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I'm using right now, and I'm looking for something a little more elegent ;) –  Skeen Aug 20 '13 at 20:53
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Unfortunately enums are not designed to be combined, so -unless implementing some factory-based ID generators, but this goes out from enums an compile-time solutions- you cannot do much more of what suggested by Ben Jackson or Mooing Duck.

Consider also that -by a language standpoint- enums are not required to be sequential, so there is no way to know how many of them are into an enum (and also makes few sense to know it, since their values can be anything), hence the compiler cannot provide any automatic mechanism to chain (Jackson) or fork (Duck), hence it's only up to you to organize them. The above cired solutions are both valid, unless you are in the position you cannot define yourself the enumeral values (for example because you've got them from somebody else API).

In this last case, the only possibility is redefine yourself the combination (with other values) and map to the original through a conversion function.

share|improve this answer
    
I am in a position to change the enums. Also if enums are not required to be sequential then shouldn't I really set all's the values of the sub enums sequentially before using either of the suggested methods? –  Skeen Aug 20 '13 at 21:29
    
Yes, every enumeral (the constant into an enum) declared with no value has the previous plus one. You just need a starting point, or mark the ending point with a suitable name... but that's exactly what the suggested methods do. The point is that's you who have to take care they don't overlap. The compiler will do nothing against that. And this is a scalability limit. –  Emilio Garavaglia Aug 21 '13 at 7:04
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Fancy Template Version

Since there's no way to know the cardinality of an enum in C++ it is stuck with a fixed offset (here hardcoded as 100, but you could get template-fancy with that as well):

template <typename T0, typename REST>
struct enum_list : REST
{
    int base() { return 100 + REST::base(); }
    int unified(T0 value) { return int(value) + base(); }
    int separated(int value, T0 dummy) { return value - base(); }  // plus assertions?
    using REST::unified;
    using REST::separated;
};

template <typename T0>
struct enum_list<T0, void>
{
    int base() { return 0; }
    int unified(T0 value) { return int(value); }
    int separated(int value, T0 dummy) { return value; }
};

template <typename T0,        typename T1 = void, typename T2 = void, typename T3 = void,
          typename T4 = void, typename T5 = void, typename T6 = void, typename T7 = void>
struct make_enum_list {
    typedef enum_list<T0, typename make_enum_list<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7>::type> type;
};
template <>
struct make_enum_list<void,void,void,void> {
    typedef void type;
};

Example

enum Foo { A, B, C };
enum Bar { D, E, F };

typedef make_enum_list<Foo, Bar>::type unifier;

template <typename E>
int unify(E value)
{
    unifier u;
    return u.unified(value);
}

template <typename E>
E separate(int value)
{
    unifier u;
    return static_cast<E>(u.separated(value, E()));
}

#include <iostream>
int
main()
{
    std::cout << unify(B) << std::endl;
    std::cout << unify(F) << std::endl;
    std::cout << separate<Foo>(101) << std::endl;
    std::cout << separate<Bar>(1) << std::endl;
}

Whenever you add a new enum you just add it to the list in typedef make_enum_list<Foo, Bar>::type unifier.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting approach. Here's one with more variadics, static (why hope that the compiler will optimize all this needless instantiation away? Empty-base classes, ok, but the most-derived enum_list doesn't need to be instantiated either :)). Also, no need for make_enum_list if the base-offset is fixed at 100. See here: ideone.com/8lL0C3 Oh, and 10 LoC less :) –  sehe Aug 21 '13 at 9:53
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About 'casting' the enums, I was thinking about a discriminated union of enums (sort of like Boost Variant but with (implicit) conversions and other conveniences specifically geared to enums. Without ado:

Assume we have two enums:

enum A { A_1, A_2, A_3, A_4 };
enum B { B_1, B_2, B_3, B_4 };

Note I donot concern myself about uniqueness of enum members, as I propose a discriminated union. Now, we'd like to be able to have a type AorB that behaves like so:

A a = A_3;
B b = B_1;

AorB any;

// any is isNil now
any = b; // makes it isB
any = a; // makes it isA

if (any == A_2) // comparison is fine, because any is in `isA` now
{
    std::cout << "Whoops, should be A_3, really\n"; // doesn't happen
}

if (any == B_2) // comparison
{
    std::cout << "Whoops, should not match"; // doesn't happen
}

a = static_cast<A>(any); // valid cast
b = static_cast<B>(any); // fails assertion

Here's my take on it:

#include <cassert> // for assert
#include <utility> // for std::swap

struct AorB
{
    enum Discriminant { isNil, isA, isB } discriminant;

    union
    {
        A valA;
        B valB;
    };

    AorB() : discriminant(isNil) {}

    A asA() const { assert(discriminant==isA); return valA; }
    B asB() const { assert(discriminant==isB); return valB; }

    explicit operator A() const { return asA(); }
    explicit operator B() const { return asB(); }

    /*explicit*/ AorB(A valA) : discriminant(isA), valA(valA) {}
    /*explicit*/ AorB(B valB) : discriminant(isB), valB(valB) {}

    friend void swap(AorB& a, AorB& b) {
        auto tmp = a; 
        a.discriminant = b.discriminant;
        a.safe_set(b.safe_get());

        b.discriminant = tmp.discriminant;
        b.safe_set(tmp.safe_get());
    }

    AorB& operator=(AorB implicit_conversion) {
        swap(implicit_conversion, *this);
        return *this;
    }

    bool operator==(AorB other) const {
        return 
            discriminant == other.discriminant && 
            safe_get()   == other.safe_get();
    }

  private:
    void safe_set(int val) {
        switch(discriminant) {
            case isA: valA = static_cast<A>(val); break;
            case isB: valB = static_cast<B>(val); break;
            case isNil: break;
        }
    }
    int safe_get() const {
        switch(discriminant) {
            case isA: return valA;
            case isB: return valB;
            case isNil: 
            default:  return 0;
        }
    }
};

See it live on Coliru, printing:

main.cpp:20: B AorB::asB() const: Assertion `discriminant==isB' failed.
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I'm not quite sure what you mean by wanting to "cast the combined enum", but to allow for enum combinations, you use a bit-field:

enum Comparison
{
    LT = 0x0001,     // "<"
    GT = 0x0002,     // ">"
    EQ = 0x0004,     // "=="
    LTEQ = 0x0005,   // "<=" - combines LT and EQ
    GTEQ = 0x0006,   // ">=" - combines GT and EQ
    NEQ = 0x0008     // "!="
};

Since a few of them cannot be merged together (something cannot be both LT and GT, for example), you can adjust the bitfield to prevent that.

EDIT:

Since it appears you are looking for something slightly different:

If you want to merge enums, you can use the method Ben Jackson already described. An alternative would be to do something like this:

enum Comparison
{
    LT,
    ...
    NEG
};

enum Logical
{
    AND,
    OR,
    ...
};

enum MyNewCombination
{
    LessThan = LT,
    ...
    NotEqual = NEG,
    And = AND,
    Or = OR,
    ...
};

This would effectively move all of your existing enums into the new MyNewCombination enum. For the valid ranges, you could cast the MyNewCombination enum to a Comparison or Logical enum.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not trying to merge these together as flags. I have several separate enums, that I'm interested in merging into a single one. –  Skeen Aug 20 '13 at 20:53
    
In that case, you either merge them into a single enum, or you chain them (Ben Jackson shows that below). –  Zac Howland Aug 20 '13 at 20:55
    
I was hoping for a third alternative, possibly using some cleaver templating, and the operator int(). –  Skeen Aug 20 '13 at 20:58
    
Without rewriting or adding stuff, you aren't going to get much more elegant, and overloading the casting operator not only wouldn't be elegant, it would reduce the readability of your code. –  Zac Howland Aug 20 '13 at 21:06
    
Will this technique ensure that the values in MyNewCombination are unique, wont the compiler assign values to the two sub-enums first, and then have issues on the third? –  Skeen Aug 20 '13 at 21:06
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