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I have a native C structure holding a pointer to a string:

struct mystruct {
  char *name;
}

and a native function that allocates memory for the name:

void fill(struct mystruct *s, int count) {
  for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    s[i].name = strdup("something");
}

The corresponding Java structure and native method are

class MyStruct extends Structure {
  String name;
}

and void fill(MyStruct[] structs, int count) used to fill up some instances. I would then use this like so:

MyStruct[] structs = new MyStruct[10];
fill(structs, structs.length);

After I'm done, there is a clean-up routine that must be called void free(MyStruct[] structs), which cleans up an entire array (all the memory allocated by strdup). There isn't a way to do clean-up on a struct instance-by-instance method.

The problem I am facing is that after freeing the array, the Java strings are corrupt. How can I create a copy each MyStruct instance so that I can free the native memory, and just deal with MyStruct instance that use pure Java strings?

share|improve this question
    
Set the struct name fields to NULL after freeing them. Otherwise JNA is going to assume it's a valid pointer and try to read from it. –  technomage Aug 20 '13 at 21:11
    
I'd also recommend making the name field a fixed-width array, then you avoid the issue of allocating and deallocating extra memory. YMMV. –  technomage Aug 20 '13 at 21:12
    
I need to free the native memory, but then have a copy of the struct to pass around (with the actual string value). –  Noah Watkins Aug 20 '13 at 21:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Once you free the native memory backing the struct, you should no longer reference the Java object, or you should create a new one with its own memory backing.

If you need to manage the memory manually, don't map the field to a String but use Pointer instead, e.g.

class MyStruct extends Structure {
    public Pointer name;
    public String getName() { return name == null ? null : name.getString(0); }
}

In general it won't directly hurt to use a JNA Structure after its native memory backing has been freed, as long as you don't call Structure.read() or Structure.write() (note that JNA calls those methods automatically before and after native function calls). However, make sure you know what you're doing if you choose to do so; there are safer ways to develop your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the read/write synchronization is what I used to fix the problem. It is only a stop-gap for the moment. –  Noah Watkins Aug 21 '13 at 19:51

Although MyStruct does not implement the Cloneable interface, it has a clone() method inherited from java.lang.Object. Thus I believe, you can overwrite clone() without interfering with JNA.

class MyStruct {
    String name;

    @Override
    protected Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
        MyStruct myStruct = new MyStruct();
        myStruct.name = new String(this.name);
        return myStruct;
    }
}

You could now iterate structs and clone each element. In case this doesn't work because of extending Structure, you could change the above method, so a different (non-native) class is instantiated.

class MyStruct {
    String name;

    @Override
    protected Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
        return new NonNativeStruct(new String(name));
    }
}

class NonNativeStruct {
    private String name;
    public NonNativeStruct(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Note that you disobey the contract x.clone().getClass() == x.getClass() doing this.

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't tired this exactly, although I did try to create a cpy of the string like you did new String(old_struct.name) and still saw the corrupt. Maybe my test was bad.. –  Noah Watkins Aug 20 '13 at 23:35
    
Did you copy before you used free? –  Bengt Aug 20 '13 at 23:39

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