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Short version: Is there anyway to nest functions inside enum classes so that as well as EnumClass::EnumLabel you can have useful related functions such as EnumClass::to_string(EnumClass value) instead of having a global function EnumClass_to_string(EnumClass value).

Long version: So I'm playing around with OpenGL which comes with a bunch of integer #defines for various features on the GPU. For C compatibility these defines have no real structure outside of their labels, making it easy to use the incorrect define. To help remedy this source of newbie bugs I've been grouping related defines in to enum classes like the following example for debug message sources:

enum class Source {
    API = GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_API,
    WINDOW_SYSTEM = GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_WINDOW_SYSTEM,
    SHADER_COMPILER = GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_SHADER_COMPILER,
    THIRD_PARTY = GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_THIRD_PARTY,
    APPLICATION = GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_APPLICATION,
    OTHER = GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_OTHER
};

Since these are commonly used in debug output, I decided to make a to_string function to simplify outputting their meanings to logfiles.

std::string source_to_string(KHR_debug::Source source) {
    if(source == KHR_debug::Source::API) {
        return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_API";
    } else if(source == KHR_debug::Source::WINDOW_SYSTEM) { 
        return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_WINDOW_SYSTEM";
    } else if(source == KHR_debug::Source::SHADER_COMPILER) {
        return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_SHADER_COMPILER";
    } else if(source == KHR_debug::Source::THIRD_PARTY) {
        return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_THIRD_PARTY";
    } else if(source == KHR_debug::Source::APPLICATION) {
        return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_APPLICATION";
    } else if(source == KHR_debug::Source::OTHER) {
        return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_OTHER";
    } else {
        return "INVALID_SOURCE_ENUM";
    }
}

However, I think it would be much neater if I could nest that helper function inside the enum class itself. So that instead of calling source_to_string(source) you could use Source::to_string(source). I appreciate that this functionality if you use the old-style enum classes where you simply wrap your enum inside a class/struct, however one of the reasons I'm using C++11 enum classes is because of their added type safety.

I tried having a class/namespace alongside the enum class however this appears to overwrite one of the existing definitions.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The idiomatic thing to do here, is use a free function: exactly like you would do

using std::to_string;

int ltuae = 42;
std::cout << "The answer: " << to_string(ltuae) << std::endl;

you can do

KHR_debug::Source s /* = ... */;
std::cout << "The source: " << to_string(s) << std::endl;

Note As written this employs a "hidden" feature of C++: Argument Dependent Lookup. Writing to_string will find KHR_debug::to_string because that namespace contains the argument type.

See it Live on Coliru

Full Sample

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
namespace KHR_debug
{

    enum class Source {
        API             /*= GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_API            */,
        WINDOW_SYSTEM   /*= GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_WINDOW_SYSTEM  */,
        SHADER_COMPILER /*= GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_SHADER_COMPILER*/,
        THIRD_PARTY     /*= GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_THIRD_PARTY    */,
        APPLICATION     /*= GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_APPLICATION    */,
        OTHER           /*= GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_OTHER          */
    };

    std::string to_string(Source source) {
        switch(source) {
            case Source::API:             return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_API";
            case Source::WINDOW_SYSTEM:   return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_WINDOW_SYSTEM";
            case Source::SHADER_COMPILER: return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_SHADER_COMPILER";
            case Source::THIRD_PARTY:     return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_THIRD_PARTY";
            case Source::APPLICATION:     return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_APPLICATION";
            case Source::OTHER:           return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_OTHER";
            default:                      return "INVALID_SOURCE_ENUM";
        }
    }
}

int main()
{
    using std::to_string;

    int ltuae = 42;
    std::cout << "The answer: " << to_string(ltuae) << std::endl;

    KHR_debug::Source s = KHR_debug::Source::APPLICATION;
    std::cout << "The source: " << to_string(s) << std::endl;
}

Note how I subtly changed your to_string method to use a switch where it should :)

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This is impossible directly.

An enum can only be declared : access enum class enumeration-identifier [:underlying-type] { enumerator-list } [var];. They can only contain enumerator-list.

But maybe you can use a Wrapper struct :

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

struct SourceWrapper
{
    enum Source {
        API = 0,
        WINDOW_SYSTEM = 1,
        SHADER_COMPILER = 2,
        THIRD_PARTY = 3,
        APPLICATION = 4,
        OTHER = 5,
    };

    static std::string ToString( Source source ) {
        if(source == Source::API) {
            return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_API";
        } else if(source == Source::WINDOW_SYSTEM) {
            return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_WINDOW_SYSTEM";
        } else if(source == Source::SHADER_COMPILER) {
            return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_SHADER_COMPILER";
        } else if(source == Source::THIRD_PARTY) {
            return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_THIRD_PARTY";
        } else if(source == Source::APPLICATION) {
            return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_APPLICATION";
        } else if(source == Source::OTHER) {
            return "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_OTHER";
        } else {
            return "INVALID_SOURCE_ENUM";
        }
    }
};

PS: I removed you GL macros for tests purpose.

Live example.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about doing it this way myself, however the issue with this is the enum labels are no longer typesafe, something that i'm using the enum classes for. For example, unless it gives a value related error, the following code is perfectly fine using enums inside classes/structs Source::ToString(AnotherEnum::Value) –  MrBushido Aug 20 '13 at 21:34
    
@MrBushido Do you have an example working with Source::ToString(AnotherEnum::Value) ? –  Pierre Fourgeaud Aug 20 '13 at 21:38
    
Ok, perhaps I've misunderstood why enum classes are considered type safe, I had assumed this code would have worked but it does not. hastebin.com/rarijapevo.cpp –  MrBushido Aug 20 '13 at 21:48
    
@MrBushido This wasn't working for me neither. But maybe the part on the enum classes of this article can help you to understand them ? –  Pierre Fourgeaud Aug 20 '13 at 21:52
    
Don't get me wrong, it not working is a good thing and means I'll be using code like yours instead enum classes! When I read about enum classes being typesafe I assumed it meant two enums with the same values would be interchangeable but this does not appear to be the case (at least in VS2012). Thanks for the help! –  MrBushido Aug 20 '13 at 22:52

Your other option is to scrap enums altogether and use a slightly more complex type. This is a little bit less syntactically friendly, but it will allow you to put methods on your enum "instances" (which are really static constants).

// Source.h
#include <string>

class Source
{
private:
    const int value;
    const std::string name;

    Source(const int value, const std::string name)
        : value(value), name(name) { }

public:
    inline std::string ToString() const { return this->name; }

    inline bool operator==(const Source &that) const
    {
        return this->value == that.value;
    }

    inline bool operator!=(const Source &that) const
    {
        return !(*this == that);
    }

    static const Source Api;
    static const Source WindowSystem;
    static const Source ShaderCompiler;
    static const Source ThirdParty;
    static const Source Application;
    static const Source Other;
};

and

// Source.cpp
const Source Source::Api = Source(0, "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_API");
const Source Source::WindowSystem = Source(1, "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_WINDOW_SYSTEM");
const Source Source::ShaderCompiler = Source(2, "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_SHADER_COMPILER");
const Source Source::ThirdParty = Source(3, "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_THIRD_PARTY");
const Source Source::Application = Source(4, "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_APPLICATION");
const Source Source::Other = Source(5, "GL_DEBUG_SOURCE_OTHER");

which allows for stuff like

Source firstSource = GetSourceFromSomewhere();
Source secondSource = GetSourceFromElsewhere();

if (firstSource != secondSource)
{
    std::cerr << "Sources are not equal: " << firstSource.ToString()
              << " and: " << secondSource.ToString();
}
else if (firstSource == Source::Other)
{
    std::cerr << "First source cannot be Other";
}
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