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I'm struggling to understand if I've indexed this query properly, it's somewhat slow and I feel it could use optimization. MySQL 5.1.70

  select snaps.id, snaps.userid, snaps.ins_time, usr.gender  
    from usersnaps as snaps  
    join user as usr on usr.id = snaps.userid  
    left join user_convert as conv on snaps.userid = conv.userid  
    where (conv.level is null or conv.level = 4) and snaps.active = 'N' 
and (usr.status = "unfilled" or usr.status = "unapproved") and usr.active = 1 
        order by snaps.ins_time asc

usersnaps table (irrelevant deta removed, size about 250k records) :

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `usersnaps` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `userid` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `picture` varchar(250) NOT NULL,
  `active` enum('N','Y') NOT NULL DEFAULT 'N',
  `ins_time` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`,`userid`),
  KEY `userid` (`userid`,`active`),
  KEY `ins_time` (`ins_time`),
  KEY `active` (`active`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

user table (irrelevant deta removed, size about 300k records) :

 CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `user` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `active` tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1',
  `status` enum('15','active','approval','suspended','unapproved','unfilled','rejected','suspended_auto','incomplete') NOT NULL DEFAULT 'approval',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `status` (`status`,`active`)
  ) ENGINE=InnoDB;

user_convert table (size about : 60k records) :

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `user_convert` (
  `userid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `level` tinyint(4) NOT NULL,
  UNIQUE KEY `userid` (`userid`),
  KEY `level` (`level`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Explain extended returns :

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys               key     key_len ref             rows    filtered    Extra
1   SIMPLE      snaps   ref     userid,default_pic,active   active  1       const           65248   100.00      Using where; Using filesort
1   SIMPLE      usr     eq_ref  PRIMARY,active,status       PRIMARY 4       snaps.userid    1       100.00      Using where
1   SIMPLE      conv    eq_ref  userid                      userid  4s      snaps.userid    1       100.00      Using where
share|improve this question
    
nevermind mistake –  Alden W. Aug 20 '13 at 21:58
    
Version of MySQL ? –  ypercube Aug 20 '13 at 22:08
    
updated with version (5.1.70) –  Sherif Buzz Aug 20 '13 at 22:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using filesort is probably your performance killer.

You need the records from usersnaps where active = 'N' and you need them sorted by ins_time.

ALTER TABLE usersnaps ADD KEY active_ins_time (active,ins_time);

Indexes are stored in sorted order, and read in sorted order... so if the optimizer chooses that index, it will go for the records with active = 'N' and -- hey, look at that -- they're already sorted by ins_time -- because of that index. So as it reads the rows referenced by the index, the result-set internally is already in the order you want it to ORDER BY, and the optimizer should realize this... no filesort required.

share|improve this answer
    
perfect thank you. I added the index, no more filesort, and performance improved –  Sherif Buzz Aug 21 '13 at 18:00

I would recommend changing the userid index (assuming you're not using it right now) to have active first and userid later.

That should make it more useful for this query.

share|improve this answer
    
It's used for other queries, but I could add userid to the 'active' index so that it's (active, userid) ? –  Sherif Buzz Aug 20 '13 at 22:25
    
I would recommend giving that a try, it should help quite a bit for this query as MySQL is currently using the active index which probably has a very low cardinality (2) which makes it fairly useless in most queries. –  Wolph Aug 20 '13 at 22:38
    
I tried it out, the only difference in the explain extended output is the "rows" on the snaps row increased from 65248 to 74987. Performance-wise it's the pretty much the same –  Sherif Buzz Aug 20 '13 at 22:45
    
In that case you have a few options... forcing MySQL to use the index, denormalisation (i.e. moving columns from the other tables to the snaps table). MySQL's query planner is not all that smart in some cases... it seems that for you it's failing a bit. –  Wolph Aug 20 '13 at 23:12

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