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I'm trying to understand how ruby handles yields and return statements and noticed that sometimes, a yield on a block with a return statement is illegal but sometimes works. I have the following example that I'm struggling with:

def foo
  yield
end

def bar
  foo do
    return 'asdf'
  end
end

Now in the above case, I know that the following will fail:

foo do
  return 'asdf'
end

> LocalJumpError: unexpected return

But the following will work (though it will return nil and not 'asdf'):

bar
=> nil 

My question is why would what appears to be similar pieces of code react so differently? Is it because the return block needs a method context to run in? An even more subtle situation is the following

def baz
  yield
  puts 'Hi'
end

def bif
  baz do
    return 'asdf'
  end
end

bif
=> nil

The "puts 'Hi'" after the yield doesn't get run at all, and I'm not sure why.

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search lambdas vs procs –  apneadiving Aug 20 '13 at 22:01
    
In your foo example, the first one does a return without being inside a method or function. The second one, inside bar has a valid return since it's inside a method. In the bif case, the return is executed before the puts is. So the puts never occurs. It's as if baz did a return then did puts. –  lurker Aug 20 '13 at 22:01
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ruby Proc can't have a return statement. The return statements that seemed to work actually belong to the method(def...end).

A good article about it: http://www.robertsosinski.com/2008/12/21/understanding-ruby-blocks-procs-and-lambdas/

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That link is actually pretty nice. To summarize in my current situation: The Proc being executed with a return DOES need to have a context to return to, which is based on where it was declared. In addition, the "block" notation in ruby generates a Proc, which halts execution on return. This is different than a lambda, which would continue. –  ckcheng Aug 20 '13 at 22:36
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