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I've been working at this long enough to see that a) there is probably an easy way to do this, and b) a fresh set of eyes will probably see it before I do. So here goes..

Two or more tests were performed to classify items into two or more categories. We hypothesize that a more reliable measurement would come from using a combination of classifiers. To test this, we need to see how predictions perform in concert with each other, rather than just aggregating results from individual tests. A first step in this analysis is simulating measurements coming from all the tests simultaneously by grouping test results into observations.

set.seed(103)
test1 <- data.frame(trueClass=rep(c('A','B','C'), times=c(2,3,4)), score=rpois(9,10))
test2 <- data.frame(trueClass=rep(c('A','B','C'), times=c(3,3,3)), score=rpois(9,5))
test3 <- data.frame(trueClass=rep(c('A','B','C'), times=c(4,2,3)), score=rpois(9,2))

all.data <- list(test1=test1, test2=test2, test3=test3)

We define an observation as an ordered triple containing one score from each test of the same trueClass. Ideally, in the end we will have a tidy data.frame that looks like

>observation.df
  test1 test2 test3 trueClass
1    11     6     2         A
2    16     4     4         A
3     6     9     2         B
4   ...

The difficulty is that the number of observations is limited by the lowest number of representations of a class in a test. In this case, the minimums are

mins <- c(A=2, B=2, C=3)

So, I would like to sample 2 test results from each test with trueClass = A, 2 with trueClass = B, and 3 with trueClass = C and store them in observation.df.

Obviously the function creating the observations needs to learn the names of the tests and the classes from all.data.

test.names <- names(all.data)
class.names <- unique(as.vector(sapply(all.data, function(i) i$trueClass)))

To get the number of each class to sample:

library(plyr)
count.table <- laply(all.data, function(i) table(i$trueClass))
mins <- apply(count.table, 2, min)

It seems to me that there should be a fairly straightforward way to go from here (probably using by or a plyr function), but I haven't succeeded in anything other than complicating the matter.

share|improve this question
    
test.names returns NULL since you didn't give them names. –  BondedDust Aug 20 '13 at 22:23
    
@DWin I edited the code to fix that error. Thanks for catching that. –  Daniel Watkins Aug 23 '13 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A rather convoluted answer potentially, but it gets the job done.

cutlist <- lapply(all.data,
  function(x)
  do.call(rbind,
    sapply(names(mins), function(y) {
       subs <- x[x$trueClass==y,]
       subs[sample(1:nrow(subs),mins[y]),]
       },
    simplify=FALSE
    )
  )
)

cbind(cutlist[[1]]["trueClass"] , sapply(cutlist,"[[","score",simplify=TRUE))

Result:

    trueClass  1 2 3
A.1         A  7 8 2
A.2         A 10 5 5
B.5         B  8 4 4
B.4         B  4 9 2
C.7         C  6 3 3
C.9         C  7 8 0
C.8         C  8 8 3
share|improve this answer
    
When I try running what you wrote, I run into the problem that cutlist[[1]] is a list with elements A, B, C, so cutlist[[1]]["trueClass"] = NULL. –  Daniel Watkins Aug 20 '13 at 23:52
    
@D_Watkins - I think you may have missed my edit - I accidentally copied an early version which was missing the do.call(rbind,...) - try the code exactly as above now. –  thelatemail Aug 21 '13 at 0:05
    
Great, that fixed the issue. –  Daniel Watkins Aug 21 '13 at 0:26

Are you looking for this? (this is a quick-and-dirty approach)

  library(plyr)
  set.seed(103)
  test1 <- data.frame(trueClass=rep(c('A','B','C'), times=c(2,3,4)), score=rpois(9,10))
  test2 <- data.frame(trueClass=rep(c('A','B','C'), times=c(3,3,3)), score=rpois(9,5))
  test3 <- data.frame(trueClass=rep(c('A','B','C'), times=c(4,2,3)), score=rpois(9,2))
  all.data <- list(test1, test2, test3)
  num<-list(1,2,3)
  kk<-Map(function(x) ddply(all.data[[x]],.(trueClass),summarize,sam1=unique(ifelse(trueClass %in% c("A","B"),sample(score,2),sample(score,3)))),num)



 > kk
[[1]]
  trueClass sam1
1         A   10
2         A    7
3         B    8
4         B    5
5         C   12
6         C    7
7         C    6

[[2]]
  trueClass sam1
1         A    5
2         A    8
3         B    4
4         B    9
5         C    8
6         C    3

[[3]]
  trueClass sam1
1         A    0
2         A    2
3         B    4
4         B    2
5         C    3
6         C    0



kkk<-ldply(kk)
kkk$test<-with(kkk,rep(c("test1","test2","test3"),c(nrow(kk[[1]]),nrow(kk[[2]]),nrow(kk[[3]]))))
> kkk
   trueClass sam1  test
1          A    7 test1
2          A   10 test1
3          B    8 test1
4          B    5 test1
5          C   12 test1
6          C    8 test1
7          C    7 test1
8          A    8 test2
9          A    5 test2
10         B    9 test2
11         B   12 test2
12         C    8 test2
13         C    3 test2
14         A    2 test3
15         A    5 test3
16         B    2 test3
17         B    4 test3
18         C    3 test3
19         C    0 test3

You can use reshape to get what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't C meant to have 3 observations not 2? –  thelatemail Aug 20 '13 at 22:25
    
@ thelatemail: Thanks.I have updated that. But, I hope there should be neat approach. –  Metrics Aug 20 '13 at 22:49
    
This is pretty close - from the look of things, merge(kk) should return the observation.df I was looking for. Something subtle is going on with the summarise call though, because we get 3 observations of C in test1 and only 2 in the other two. The call to create kk can be simplified by using lapply(all.data, function(x) ddply(x, ..., although using Map is cool. –  Daniel Watkins Aug 20 '13 at 23:21
    
Map is same as lapply with one input. So, you will get the same result. –  Metrics Aug 20 '13 at 23:32
    
@Metrics - Map is actually mapply(...,SIMPLIFY=FALSE), but it will work similarly to lapply with the order of the arguments reversed. –  thelatemail Aug 20 '13 at 23:40

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