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We have a .NET Windows desktop application (C#) that launches an accompanying web page in an external browser window, and then needs to communicate with that page via javascript.

We have successfully done this with Internet Explorer, using mshtml.HTMLDocument. We iterate over the ShellWindows to find the open Internet Explorer window, and then can do something like the following:

mshtml.HTMLDocument doc = iExplorer.Document;
mshtml.IHTMLWindow2 win = doc.parentWindow as mshtml.IHTMLWindow2;
win.execScript("myJavaScriptFunction('arg1','arg2')", "javascript");

Is there an equivalent way to do this with Chrome? We can find the Chrome window, but is there an equivalent API we can call into to execute javascript on the desired page?

share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at signalr? Http://github.com/signalr That's assuming it's an ASP.NET app... what type of C# app is it? – SteveChapman Aug 20 '13 at 22:17
    
Thanks for the reply, it's a C# windows desktop application. – rjy Aug 20 '13 at 22:50
    
Do you own and maintain the website code? If so, what's it written in? – SteveChapman Aug 20 '13 at 23:05
    
There is a way to do this in limited circumstances. If you launch Chrome in debug mode, then use the JSON/WebSocket4Net you can communicate with chrome and give it javascript commands. – John Davis Aug 20 '13 at 23:06
    
This is all enterprise software - big and complex, much of it generated by JSPs as well as proprietary code generation. And thanks for your response John. It sounds like this is not very do-able in a "normal" environment, not in debug mode (or test automation mode, as I've seen elsewhere while researching this...) – rjy Aug 21 '13 at 3:51

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