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I have 2 classes: Base and Starter. This is the code in Base:

String contestantName;

public Base (String contestantName) {
    this.contestantName = contestantName;
}

public void setName() {
    contestantName = "Tony";
}

public void returnName() {
    System.out.println(contestantName);
}

This is the code in Starter:

    public static void main(String[] args) {

    Base tester = new Base(null);

    tester.returnName();

    tester.setName();

    tester.returnName();

}

I was wondering if someone could explain to me the sequence of events here. I've declared the variable contestantName and called it in the statement body of Base(). When I create tester, it's contestantName starts out as null. After re-assigning contestantName as "Tony" for tester, when does the constructor for tester "know" that it's contestantName has changed? Does it have to do with implicit vs. explicit calls (i.e. I explicitly call setName() and then the JVM/Java implicitly calls String contestantName following the re-assignment)?

Also, does me asking this reveal some sort of topic or information that I'm lacking, and if so, what is it and where can I learn it? Also sort of off-topic, but is the nomenclature I'm using correct?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Brian Roach, Raedwald, RandolphCarter, rene, morgano Aug 21 '13 at 9:20

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Your question makes absolutely no sense. When you called the constructor, you passed null to it and that was assigned to contestantName. Then you called setName() which assigned "Tony" to contestantName. Then you called returnName() which ... returned "Tony" as that is what is assigned to contestantName –  Brian Roach Aug 21 '13 at 1:44
    
@BrianRoach Thank you so much for that. I mean this sincerely and not sarcastically. Really, it revealed to me the actual functionality of how constructors work. The parameters in constructors are USED to assign values to the class variables in the class. For some reason, I was thinking constructors work by assigning the values of the class variables of the class to the parameters of the constructor (for some insane reason) and thereby assign values to the instanced object. Anyway, I think I have it right now. Again, thanks. Seriously. –  Tom Fang Aug 21 '13 at 2:23
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6 Answers

It "knows" its name is Tony after you call the method. If you never call the method it will never know it's called anything but "null" (Which would be sad, I think.) Seeing as how it's not actually called in any way from the constructor it will only ever "know" that it set it to null. It will then change without the constructor receiving any update.

You should also probably set your returnName() method to something like the following

public String returnName(){
   return contestantName;
}

So it returns the value you want to print out, as that seems to be what you're after to me (then print whatever the returned string is on your main method.)

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The constructor really should never know when the value has changed. The constructor can be simplified to the point of just being a method to create a new object. Once the method has executed all of it's directions given by the programmer, it is done. The object then should be set up. So when you use setName(), the Base object has had it's value changed. The constructor no longer has any effect on this object by that time, though.

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The sequence of events is literally your code in Starter.

I think you need to differentiate between what-is-code and what-is-memory. All a Java object is, is a wad of memory tied to a some behavior (code).

The constructor is a set of instructions for how to set up an object. It doesn't "know" anything - it runs exactly once when an object is constructed and never again for the lifetime of that object (wad of memory tied to the code for Base).

So the exact sequence of events is:

  • JVM loads and verifies the class Base
  • Base tester means "reserve enough bytes of memory for a reference to an instance of Base, which will be referred to by the name tester
  • new Base() means
    • Transfer execution to the constructor for Base
      • Transfer execution to the constructor for java.lang.Object since Base (automatically) extends Object unless you say it extends something else
      • Initialize any fields which are part of Base
      • Run the code in the Base constructor, which assigns the parameter contestantName to the instance variable contestantName
        • Literally this means "copy the memory address of the String the contestantName parameter points to into the instance variable contestantName

When you call setName() and it changes the value of the instance variable contestantName, that has nothing to do with the constructor - the constructor is just some stuff that runs when your Base object is created.

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Firstly the object Base is created with empty contestantName, assigned to null. After new Base(null), contestantName is again assigned to null. Then contestantName is printed. The output is null. Then after calling setName contestantName is assigned to Tony. At the end Tony value of contestantName is printed.

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In the setName() method when you write contestantName you are actually accessing this.contestantName. In that method you can use both notations, so writing:

public void setName() {
    contestantName = "Tony";
}

or

public void setName() {
    this.contestantName = "Tony";
}

is exactly the same.

In the constructor the thing are a bit different you can't write:

public Base (String contestantName) {
    contestantName = contestantName;
}

because the parameter contenstantName "hides" the field with the same name, so you are basically assigning the parameter to itself. In this case you can put the prefix this. like you did or change parameter name to avoid name clashes, for example:

public Base (String cName) {
    contestantName = cName;
}

Hope this clarifies a bit.

You should read some variable/field scope tutorial to understand better how variables are referred in Java.

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I don't think the constructor "knows" contestantName has changed. The constructor just sets contestantName to whatever you passed it. The constructor is used for creating the object and modifies the properties of the object (e.g. contestantName), so that the object can be used (e.g. in your main method). Here's what I believe happens:

Your main method is the first thing run when you run a Java program.

In your main method, you declare a variable, tester, with

Base tester ...

You assign tester (using "Base tester = ") to

new Base(null)

which calls the constructor of the Base class and passes it null as a parameter. In the Base class you have a field contestantName because you declared

String contestantName;

Now, we execute whatever you wrote in the constructor for the Base class. This statement in the constructor executes:

this.contestantName = contestantName;

and since you passed in null as the parameter, this.contestantName is set to null. Now that the constructor call has completed, the object is created, and we return to the main method, where the new Base object we just created is assigned to the variable tester. This statement has now completed:

Base tester = new Base(null);

The next statement in your main method is

tester.returnName();

This calls the returnName() function for tester. Therefore, the statement in the returnName() method

System.out.println(contestantName);

executes. Since contestantName has been set to null, null should be what your computer prints out. This returnName() method completes and we return to the main method. The next statement in the main method is

tester.setName();

So, we execute the setName() method. In the setName() method, there is the statement

contestantName = "Tony";

Therefore, the field in the tester object, contestName is set to "Tony" - it is no longer null. Now the setName() method finishes and we return to the main method.

The final statement in your main method is

tester.returnName();

Therefore, we execute the returnName() method in the tester object. The returnName() method has the statement

System.out.println(contestantName);

If you recall, contestantName has been set to "Tony", so this time, your computer should print out "Tony". And now that the returnName() method has completed, we return to the main method.

The main method reaches its end, so it finishes and your program terminates.

Let me know if something isn't clear.

As for your naming your methods, the returnName() function should probably be renamed to printName(). After all, returnName() doesn't return anything (it's return type is void).

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