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I am new to Java and I am trying to make a Java app where it asks you to spell "Java" and if you spelled it correctly it will type "yes", however, it is typing "no", what am I doing wrong:

package quiz;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class quiz {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner kirill = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println(kirill.next());
        String kirill2 = "Java";
        if (kirill.equals(kirill2)){
            System.out.println("yes");
        }else{
            System.out.println("no");
        }
        System.out.println(kirill);
        kirill.close();
    }

}

Running code: Java

Java

no

java.util.Scanner[delimiters=\p{javaWhitespace}+][position=4][match valid=true][need input=false][source closed=false][skipped=false][group separator=\,][decimal separator=.][positive prefix=][negative prefix=\Q-\E][positive suffix=][negative suffix=][NaN string=\Q?\E][infinity string=\Q?\E]

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closed as off-topic by Brian Roach, Raedwald, Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera, Antti Haapala, Aron Rotteveel Aug 21 '13 at 9:57

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Brian Roach, Raedwald, Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera, Antti Haapala, Aron Rotteveel
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You should consider using meaningful variable names, even if they're the same word as the class name. Also, try stepping through your code in the debugger and poking at the values of stuff. Are the two strings really equal? Maybe the one you're reading from the console has a newline at the end or something. –  millimoose Aug 21 '13 at 1:23
    
Package names usually are com.example.name and class names typically start with capitol letters. –  user2638922 Aug 21 '13 at 1:27
    
We know you love your username but it has to stop. –  Ravi Thapliyal Aug 21 '13 at 1:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
if (kirill.equals(kirill2)){

kirill is the Scanner object, not the string. Try something like this:

Scanner kirill = new Scanner(System.in);
String userInput = kirill.next();
if (userInput.equals("Java")){
    ...

Also, note that your code will print "yes" if the user types "Java is a programming langauge." If you only want it to validate with just "Java," replace next with nextLine.

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package quiz;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class quiz {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String kirill;
        String kirill2 = "Java";
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        kirill = input.next(); 
        if (kirill.equals(kirill2)){
            System.out.println("yes");
        }else{
            System.out.println("no");
        }
        System.out.println(kirill);
        input.close();
    }

}

Minor issue with your Scanner. You were trying to match a Scanner to a String. You can't to that silly!

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1  
+1 and major issues with variable names :) –  Ravi Thapliyal Aug 21 '13 at 1:27

Save what you're reading into a String instead of comparing the Scanner object with a String. Your main method should look something like

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner kirill = new Scanner(System.in);
    String input = kirill.nextLine();
    System.out.println(input);
    String kirill2 = "Java";
    if (input.equals(kirill2)){
        System.out.println("yes");
    }else{
        System.out.println("no");
    }
    System.out.println(kirill);
    kirill.close();
}

Also, note that .next() will only scan to the first delimiter (which is by default any whitespace), so if you want to make sure that the user only types "Java", then you should probably use .nextLine() instead of .next().

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Let's take a quick look on your code, inside main():

Scanner kirill = new Scanner(System.in);

creates a scanner and assigns it to a variable, OK.

System.out.println(kirill.next());

Prints what the user types, but doesn't assign it to anything.

String kirill2 = "Java";

Just a String variable... OK.

if (input.equals(kirill2)){

If the scanner equals some text, then proceed. Hold on, you see what I just said? Comparing a Scanner and a String. This wouldn't end up right. Imagine a robot, and you give it a cup of water and a paper with "water" written on it, and ask if they are equal. Obviously they're not, and they can't be. You are comparing a set value with another set value, instead of the user's input. The following would be correct:

package quiz;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class quiz {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in); //creates a scanner
        String text = "Java";                  //creates the text to be compared
        String input = scan.nextLine();        //read some arbitrary text the user types
        if (input.equals(text)){               //checks if user's input is equal to text
            System.out.println("yes");
        }else{
            System.out.println("no");
        }
        scan.close();                         //closes the Scanner
    }
}

Although not required, it's a good practice to name variables after what they do or represent, or you will get confused very quickly...

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So here, an easier method would be:

package quiz;
import java.util.Scanner;

 public static void main(String[] args) {

 String userInput;
 String word = "Java":

 Scanner in1 = new Scanner(System.in);
 userInput = in1.next();
 System.out.println( userInput );

 if (word.equals(userInput)) {
     System.out.println("Yes!");
     }else{
         System.out.println("No.");
         }

System.out.println( userInput );
userInput.close();

}

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