Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am able to the js file to fire which does do the first alert but i cannot get the 2nd alert to happen, php file is there and working returning 0 but the alert('finished post'); is not coming up. I think its some syntax I am missing.

$(function () {
$("#login_form").submit(function () {
    alert('started js');
    //get the username and password  
    var username = $('#username').val();
    var password = $('#password').val();

    //use ajax to run the check  
    $.post("../php/checklogin.php", { username: username, password: password }, 
        function (result) {
            alert('finished post');
            //if the result is not 1  
            if (result == 0) {
                //Alert username and password are wrong 
                $('#login').html('Credentials wrong');
                alert('got 0');
            }
    });
});

});

Here is the php

session_start();
include 'anonconnect.php';

// username and password sent from form 
$myusername= $_POST['username']; 
$mypassword= $_POST['password']; 

$sql = $dbh->prepare("SELECT * FROM Users WHERE UserLogin= :login");
$sql->execute(array(':login' => $myusername));
$sql = $sql->fetch();

$admin = $sql['admin'];

$password_hash = $sql['UserPass'];
$salt = $sql['salt'];

/*** close the database connection ***/
$dbh = null;

if(crypt($mypassword, $salt) == $password_hash){
    // Register $myusername, $mypassword and redirect to file
    $_SESSION['myusername'] = $myusername;
    $_SESSION['loggedin'];
    $_SESSION['loggedin'] = 1;

    if($admin == 1){
        $_SESSION['admin'] = 1;
    }

    header("location:search.php");
}
else {
    $_SESSION['loggedin'];
    $_SESSION['loggedin'] = 0;
    echo 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
check your browser console to see whether there are any errors –  Arun P Johny Aug 21 '13 at 3:30
    
also add a fail handler to see whether there is any errors like $.post("../php/checklogin.php", { username: username, password: password }, function(result) {...}).fail(function(){console.log('error', arguments)}) –  Arun P Johny Aug 21 '13 at 3:31
    
I am not getting any console errors even after adding the code. –  user1552172 Aug 21 '13 at 3:36
1  
What about the "Net" tab in Chrome / Firebug? You should see a POST request going to ../php/checklogin.php. What details can you see there? –  Phil Aug 21 '13 at 3:38
    
I am not getting a post hmm.. interesting. –  user1552172 Aug 21 '13 at 3:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok so I'll take a stab at this, see if we can work this out. First, let's clean up your code a little bit - clean code is always easiest to debug:

$(function () {
  $("#login_form").on('submit', function(){
    console.log('form submitted');

    // get the username and password  
    var login_info = { username: $('#username').val(), password: $('#password').val() }

    // use ajax to run the check
    $.ajax({
      url: '../php/checklogin.php',
      type: 'POST',
      data: login_info,
      success: loginHandler
      error: function(xhr, status, err){ console.log(xhr, status, err); }
    });

   return false;

  });

  function loginHandler(loggedIn){
    if (!loggedIn) {
      console.log('login incorrect');
    } else {
      console.log('logged in');
    }
  }

});

...ok great, we're looking a little better now. Let's go over the changes made quickly.


  • First, swapped alerts for console.logs - much less annoying. Open up your console to check this out -- command + optn + J if you're using Chrome.

  • Second, we compressed the login info a bit - this is just aesthetics and makes our code a little cleaner. Really you should be using variables when they need to be used again, and in this case you only use them once.

  • Next, we swapped the $.post function for $.ajax. This gives us two things -- one is a little finer control over the request details, and the second is an error callback, which in this case is especially important since you almost certainly are getting a server error which is your original problem. Here are the docs for $.ajax for any further clarification.

  • We're also pointing the success handler to a function to minimize the nesting here. You can see the function declared down below, and it will receive the data returned by the server.

  • Finally we're returning false so that the page doesn't refresh.


Now, let's get to the issue. When you use this code, you should see a couple things in your console. The first will probably be a red message with something like 500 internal server error, and the second should be the results of the error callback for the ajax function. You can get even more details on this in Chrome specifically if you click over to the Network Tab and look through the details of the request and response.

I can't fix your PHP because you didn't post it, but I'll assume you'll either follow up with an edit or figure that out yourself. Once you have the server issue ironed out, you should get back a clean console.log with the response you sent back, and you can move ahead.

Alternately, this will work because of the lack of page refresh in which case you can ignore the previous 2 paragraphs and declare victory : )

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
I am getting a expected } on line 14 error –  user1552172 Aug 21 '13 at 3:50
    
Your note about swapping $.post to $.ajax is incorrect. All jQuery AJAX methods (like $.post()) return a Promise object, thus giving you access to the fail callback for error handling. Also, why would you assume they'd get a 500 error? –  Phil Aug 21 '13 at 3:53
    
added the php to give a better idea of whats going on. –  user1552172 Aug 21 '13 at 3:59
    
Sorry @user1552172, forgot a comma in there - edited to correct. –  Jeff Escalante Aug 21 '13 at 3:59
    
@Phil, you are partially right, but a promise is a promise, not a callback, and I didn't want to get into promises in this answer. I think $.ajax is a better way to start out with jquery ajax requests at the beginning anyway. And I assumed a 500 error because it didn't hit the success callback. –  Jeff Escalante Aug 21 '13 at 4:01

Ah, so damned obvious. You aren't cancelling the default submit action so the form is submitting normally. Add this

$("#login_form").submit(function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();

    // and so on

See http://api.jquery.com/event.preventDefault/

share|improve this answer

you need to change 2nd line and add the e.preventDefault to prevent the form from refreshing the whole page.

$("#login_form").submit(function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();

Also I would change the AJAX request to use GET and change the code in PHP to read variables from GET so you can easily test the PHP page is working by running it in the browser like this checklogin.php?username=x&password=y

share|improve this answer
    
Changing this to a GET request is a terrible idea –  Phil Aug 21 '13 at 3:46
1  
Sensitive data should never be passed in the query string. Unless you mean only for debugging this issue. –  Jason P Aug 21 '13 at 3:48
1  
I think he did mean for debugging. –  user1552172 Aug 21 '13 at 3:51
    
@Phil I said "to easily test" :) –  Michael B. Aug 21 '13 at 3:58
    
Changing code for testing is bad. For testing POST requests, see cURL or if you want to stick to your browser, there are plenty of REST client style addons available. –  Phil Aug 21 '13 at 4:00

try this:

$("#login_form").submit(function () {
    alert('started js');
    //get the username and password  
    var username = $('#username').val();
    var password = $('#password').val();

    //use ajax to run the check  
    $.post("../php/checklogin.php", { username: username, password: password }, function (result) {
        alert('finished post');
        //if the result is not 1  
        if (result == '0') {
        //Alert username and password are wrong 
            $('#login').html('Credentials wrong');
            alert('got 0');
        }
    }, 'text');
});
  1. }, 'text');

maybe the server does not give the right data format. for example, if you request for json, and the jQuery cannot convert result sting to json. then the function would not be executed and then you would not able to get 'alert('got 0');' thing.

share|improve this answer
    
In JavaScript, '0' is equal (==) to 0 (but not identical ===) –  Phil Aug 21 '13 at 3:47
    
@Phil: oh, yes. merci :) –  MichaelLuthor Aug 21 '13 at 3:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.