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document.getElementById("someElement").addEventListener('click', function (event) {
    this._output.innerHTML = this.add(
        parseInt(this._x.value),
        parseInt(this._y.value)
    ).toString();

If you take a look at the above statement, you can see that it is simply some HTML that is used to attach an event-listener to a piece of DOM. Below is some code that does the same thing:

document.getElementById("someElement").addEventListener('click', (event) => {
    this._output.innerHTML = this.add(
        parseInt(this._x.value),
        parseInt(this._y.value)
    ).toString();
});

Here is the problem, in the first code sample, TypeScript does not give me any error, meaning that all paremeters for addEventListener match. However, when I use the second one, there seems to be a problem. Typescript says, "Argument Types do not match paremeters".

What can I do to fix this. I am using Typescript 0.9.1 with Webstorm 7.0 EAP.

UPDATE 1

So, I've fixed my initial problem by changing the code to the following, after looking at the main declaration file in typescript:

document.getElementById("Add").addEventListener('click',(event):void => {
    this._output.innerHTML = this.add(
        parseInt(this._x.value),
        parseInt(this._y.value)
    ).toString();

If you take a look, I just added a return type. Now, I have a new problem: Typescript complains that this._output is an unresolved variable. This is my full typeScript class:

class Calculator {
    private _x:HTMLInputElement;
    private _y:HTMLInputElement;
    private _output:HTMLSpanElement;

    constructor (xID: string, yID: string, outputID: string) {
        this._x = <HTMLInputElement> document.getElementById(xID);
        this._y = <HTMLInputElement> document.getElementById(yID);
        this._output = <HTMLInputElement> document.getElementById(outputID);

        this.makeCalculator();
    }

    add (x: number, y: number) {
        return x + y;
    }

    subtract (x: number, y: number) {
        return x - y;
    }

    makeCalculator () {
        document.getElementById("Add").addEventListener('click',(event):void => {
            this._output.innerHTML = this.add(
                parseInt(this._x.value),
                parseInt(this._y.value)
            ).toString();
        });
        document.getElementById("Subtract").addEventListener('click', (event):void => {
            this._output.innerHTML = this.subtract(
                parseInt(this._x.value),
                parseInt(this._y.value)
            ).toString();
        });
    }
}

As you can see, I am trying to make a simple calculator in typescript.

share|improve this question
    
the code is OK; this is a bug in WebStorm - please vote for this ticket –  lena Aug 21 '13 at 11:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you want to use the lexically escaped value of this (which refers to the class) as well we as the context value of this (e.g the this inside a jquery callback which refers to the element that raised the event etc). You cannot use fat arrow / lambdas ()=>{}. You use function, and store this for the class variable yourself.

However in your code I see that you only want to use this which refers to the class so a lambda ()=>{} is sufficient for your case. Your code compiles fine: Check it online.

share|improve this answer
    
Anything can compile, but this has errors. –  Games Brainiac Aug 21 '13 at 9:26
    
You said "Typescript complains that this._output is an unresolved variable." In the link I shared it doesn't. I don't see the error you want resolved :) –  basarat Aug 21 '13 at 10:09

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