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I've used a code base before that had a macro system for enabling and disabling sections of code. It looked something like the following:

#define IN_USE      X
#define NOT_IN_USE  _

#if defined( WIN32 )
    #define FEATURE_A       IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       NOT_IN_USE
#elif defined( OSX )
    #define FEATURE_A       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       IN_USE
#else
    #define FEATURE_A       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       NOT_IN_USE
#endif

Then the code for the features would look like:

void DoFeatures()
{
#if USING( FEATURE_A )
    // Feature A code...
#endif

#if USING( FEATURE_B )
    // Feature B code...
#endif

#if USING( FEATURE_C )
    // Feature C code...
#endif

#if USING( FEATURE_D ) // Compile error since FEATURE_D was never defined
    // Feature D code...
#endif
}

My question (the part I don't remember) is how to define the 'USING' macro so that it errors if the feature hasn't been defined as 'IN_USE' or 'NOT_IN_USE'? Which could be the case if you forget to include the correct header file.

#define USING( feature ) ((feature == IN_USE) ? 1 : ((feature == NOT_IN_USE) ? 0 : COMPILE_ERROR?))
share|improve this question
    
I'm kind of confused at the existence of IN_USE and NOT_IN_USE. –  chris Aug 21 '13 at 3:58
    
I believe it was just to make things more readable. You could just as easily define the features as 'X' and '_' or any other random character(s) as long as the USING macro used the same. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:02
    
Why you don't just remove the NOT_IN_USE define? –  Lidong Guo Aug 21 '13 at 4:10
    
I don't understand what you mean. How would that cause an error if the feature wasn't defined, such as FEATURE_D in the example? –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your example already achieves what you want, since #if USING(x) will produce an error message if USING isn't defined. All you need in your header file is something like

#define IN_USE 1
#define NOT_IN_USE 0
#define USING(feature) feature

If you want to be sure that you also get an error just for doing something like

#if FEATURE

or

#if USING(UNDEFINED_MISPELED_FEETURE)

then you could do, say,

#define IN_USE == 1
#define NOT_IN_USE == 0
#define USING(feature) 1 feature

but you won't be able to prevent such misuse as

#ifdef FEATURE
share|improve this answer
    
I want the error if the feature isn't defined, not the USING macro. Such as FEATURE_D in my example. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:45
    
@0x48492121 Like I said: "or #if USING(fred) where fred isn't a feature". Also, you said that you want to detect not including the header file ... like I said, if the header file isn't included, you will get an error an any occurrence of #if USING(...) –  Jim Balter Aug 21 '13 at 4:46
    
@0x48492121 Again: #if USING(FEATURE_D) will produce an error message using my second proposal: error: missing binary operator before token "FEATURE_D" ... and if you don't like that proposal, there's an infinity of similar ones. –  Jim Balter Aug 21 '13 at 4:56
    
Ah.. Sorry I missed understood the fred part. Seems to work. I'm confused with what "#define USING(feature) 1 feature" is actually doing. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:57
    
@0x48492121 feature is either == 1 or == 0, so it produces 1 == 1 or 1 == 0. This should be clear if you understand that the preprocessor just does textual (or token) substitution. –  Jim Balter Aug 21 '13 at 4:58

Just don't define it if it is not in use

#if defined( WIN32 )
    #define FEATURE_A       
    #define FEATURE_B       
#else if defined( OSX )
    #define FEATURE_C      
#else

#endif

Then In you code:

void DoFeatures()
{
#ifdef FEATURE_A
    // Feature A code...
#endif

#ifdef FEATURE_B
    // Feature B code...
#endif

#ifdef FEATURE_C
    // Feature C code...
#endif

#ifdef FEATURE_D // Compile error since FEATURE_D was never defined
    // Feature D code...
#endif
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to generate an error if the feature isn't defined. if "#define FEATURE_A" is in some header and you check "#ifdef FEATURE_A" without including the header, it will silently skip that code. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:25

Couldn't you just use another group of #ifdefs?

#if defined(WIN32)
    #define FEATURE_A
    #define FEATURE_B
#elif defined (OSX)
    #define FEATURE_C
#endif

// ...

#if defined(FEATURE_A)
    do_a();
#endif

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to generate an error if the feature isn't defined. This was to prevent typos such as: "#if defined(FAETURE_A)" or if the you forget to include the header that defines the feature. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:22
    
@0x48492121 Then #define FEATURE_A to 1 or 0, depending on if it is or isn't present, then inside the #ifdef FEATURE_A, insert another level of conditionals: #if FEATURE_A. Then, the #else part of the #ifdef should contain an #error "feature inclusion typo detected". –  user529758 Aug 21 '13 at 4:26
    
The USING macro is to keep the code cleaner by not having the additional level of conditionals. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:40
    
@0x48492121 You know you just accepted an answer that's essentially a copy of mine, some 23 minutes later? –  user529758 Aug 21 '13 at 5:00
    
I did? I must of missed something. I don't see how your answer generates the error when FEATURE_D isn't defined. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 5:09
#define IN_USE      1
//#define NOT_IN_USE  _  //Not required


#if defined( WIN32 )
    #define FEATURE_A       IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       NOT_IN_USE
#elif defined( OSX )
    #define FEATURE_A       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       IN_USE
#else
    #define FEATURE_A       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       NOT_IN_USE
#endif

#define USING( feature ) feature

And then your code

share|improve this answer
    
I want the compiler to error if the USING macro is used with a feature that isn't defined. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:29

How about something like this?

#define IN_USE      1
#define NOT_IN_USE  0

#if defined( WIN32 )
    #define FEATURE_A       IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       NOT_IN_USE
#elif defined( OSX )
    #define FEATURE_A       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       IN_USE
#else
    #define FEATURE_A       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_B       NOT_IN_USE
    #define FEATURE_C       NOT_IN_USE
#endif

#define USING(f) ((f == IN_USE) ? 1 : (f == NOT_IN_USE) ? 0 : (f))

#include <stdio.h>

void DoFeatures()
{
#if USING( FEATURE_A )
    // Feature A code...
    printf("Feature A\n");
#endif

#if USING( FEATURE_B )
    // Feature B code...
    printf("Feature B\n");
#endif

#if USING( FEATURE_C )
    // Feature C code...
    printf("Feature C\n");
#endif

#if defined( FEATURE_D ) // Compile error since FEATURE_D was never defined
    // Feature D code...
    printf("Feature D\n");
#else
#error FEATURE_D not defined.
#endif
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    DoFeatures();
    return 0;
}

For the compilation error, I have no idea how to integrate it into the macro. It would be appreciated if somebody could shed us some light. :P

share|improve this answer
    
I know it's possible, just don't know how to integrate it either. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 4:43

The following works. It will give you compile error for FEATURE_D. If you comment out the code for FEATURE_D, then it will execute code for FEATURE_A and FEATURE_B. The code is pretty much self-explanatory. Instead of checking whether FEATURE_D or others are defined inside DoFeatures function, you can just put them inside an if block. In that way, the compiler will try to execute the code block. If it is 1, then the code inside if block will get executed; in case of 0, it will not get executed. And if it is never defined, then will get a compile error.

#include <stdio.h>

#define IN_USE      1
#define NOT_IN_USE  0

#define FEATURE_A       IN_USE
#define FEATURE_B       IN_USE
#define FEATURE_C       NOT_IN_USE


void DoFeatures()
{
    if(FEATURE_A){
        // Feature A code...
        printf("Feature A\n");
    }

    if(FEATURE_B){
        // Feature B code...
        printf("Feature B\n");
    }

    if(FEATURE_C){
        // Feature C code...
        printf("Feature C\n");
    }

    if(FEATURE_D) {// Compile error since FEATURE_D was never defined
        // Feature D code...
        printf("Feature D\n");
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    DoFeatures();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That works, but it won't remove the code from being compiled and adds unnecessary runtime checks. –  0x48492121 Aug 21 '13 at 5:14
    
@0x48492121 There are no unnecessary runtime checks if you optimize (and you're not caring about time if you don't), but it doesn't solve the problem when code must be removed because there would be syntax errors or other problems otherwise. –  Jim Balter Aug 21 '13 at 5:20
    
@JimBalter, I don't get this part "doesn't solve the problem when code must be removed because there would be syntax errors" because the question says: "it errors if the feature hasn't been defined as 'IN_USE' or 'NOT_IN_USE'? Which could be the case if you forget to include the correct header file." and I think I have ensured this error checking. –  kaisernahid Aug 21 '13 at 7:22
    
The two things you're quoting have nothing to do with each other. The OP wants preprocessor #if, not C language level if(...). Preprocessor ifdefs are often used at file level, where your expressions cannot be used, or to comment out code that depends on typedefs or other declarations that aren't available so the code would generate syntax errors ... putting it inside if(0) { ... } doesn't affect the syntax checker. –  Jim Balter Aug 21 '13 at 7:33

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