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I'm writing some custom matchers to simplfy junit asserts. Most of them extend TypeSafeMatcher, so I only need to override three methods:

public class NoneConstraintViolationMatcher<T> extends
    TypeSafeMatcher<Set<ConstraintViolation<T>>> {

    @Override
    public void describeTo(Description description) {
        description.appendText("None constraint violations found");
    }

    @Override
    protected void describeMismatchSafely(Set<ConstraintViolation<T>> item,
        Description mismatchDescription) {
        mismatchDescription.
            appendText("Unexpected constraint violation found, but got ");
        mismatchDescription.appendValueList("", ",", "", item);
    }

    @Override
    protected boolean matchesSafely(Set<ConstraintViolation<T>> item) {
        return item.isEmpty();
    }
}

My question is how to test them? My current solution is

public class NoneConstraintViolationMatcherUnitTests {

    private NoneConstraintViolationMatcher<Object> matcher = 
        new NoneConstraintViolationMatcher<Object>();

    @Test
    public void returnsMatchedGivenNoneConstraintViolations() throws Excetpion {
         assertTrue(matcher.matches(.....));
    }  

    @Test
    public void returnsMismatchedGivenSomeConstraintViolations() throws Excetpion {
         assertThat(matcher.matches(.....), is(false));
    }        

    @Test
    public void returnsConstraintViolationsFoundWhenMismatched()
        throws Exception {

        StringBuilder out = new StringBuilder();
        //I don't find anything could be used to assert in description

        StringDescription description = new StringDescription(out);

        matcher.describeMismatch(..someCvx, description);

        assertThat(out.toString(), 
            equalTo("Unexpected constraint violation found, but got "));
    }
 }

Another solution that comes to my mind is write a junit test and use @Rule ExpectedException(with handleAssertionError set to true).

How do you guys test matchers? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

I'm using assertThat for testing the matches functionality.

@Test
public void returnsMatchedGivenNoneConstraintViolations() throws Excetpion {
     assertThat(someObject, matcher);
}  

@Test
public void returnsMismatchedGivenSomeConstraintViolations() throws Excetpion {
     assertThat(someObject, not(matcher));
}   
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the response. Is it easy to test description by using this solution? – Hippoom Aug 21 '13 at 16:01

To answer your follow-up question about testing the description, I don't see that as necessary. I consider it sufficient to write your returnsConstraintViolationsFoundWhenMismatched test like this

@Test(expected=Exception.class)
public void returnsConstraintViolationsFoundWhenMismatched() {
  // Use the matcher in a way that causes an exception to be thrown
}

The important verification is that the proper exception was thrown. Testing the content of the actual message and is not adding any value to your test suite. You can just trust that the Hamcrest library is doing the right thing with the text you append to the description.

share|improve this answer
1  
I have a situation in which I would like to test the description. This is because I'm checking the contents of a collection and want to report only the mismatches. More specifically, I want to check the logic (eg loops and conditions) of the description rather than the generated text. The logic should match the logic in the matchesSafely method, but it's not so straightforward to reuse logic code in Java. – Noel Yap Jun 27 '14 at 22:21
    
If the logic for matchesSafely and the generation of the description overlap, you can write a private method in the Hamcrest matcher class to reuse the code. Then by testing the matcher, you are implicitly testing the logic that produces the description too. – Nick A. Watts Jul 1 '14 at 20:10
    
Sorry, when I say the logic is the same, I mean the conditions, not the bodies of the loops and conditions. For example matchesSafely may have if (A) return false; if (B) return false; return true; while describeTo will have if (A) description.appendText("A"); if (B) depscription.appendText("B");. I suppose the Template Method Pattern would fit here, but it's pretty verbose in Java (pre-Java 8). – Noel Yap Jul 1 '14 at 22:06

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