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What does it mean to "return the client?"

My teacher asked in an assignment to write a method that will return the date and the client. Here is her exact wording:

" You should also override the ToString method, to return the date and the client. (DateTime has a reasonable ToString method defined. Use it.) I found using "\t" (the tab symbol) helpful in lining up columns. "

I'm not sure what she is asking when she says to return the client. I understand how to return the date. Thank you.

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what is the general assignment ? –  Dani Dec 2 '09 at 18:45
    
Err... The class that she let you change, has a "Client" Property or member? –  Limo Wan Kenobi Dec 2 '09 at 18:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe the client is the object you use ToString on. Like intSomeInteger.ToString

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Maybe you should ask her.

In the working world you'll want to get as much clarification from your customer on the deliverables as required.

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That's a great point. Thank you. –  Lou Dec 2 '09 at 18:51

maybe she meant to the client (the caller of the function ?)

if you have other data in your object, maybe she wants you to return it in a certain way (and not the default ToString() behaviour ?

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your first suggestion seems like the most logical explanation. –  Cheeso Dec 2 '09 at 19:17

Might be a typo -- maybe instead of "return the date and the client" she meant "return the date to the client"?

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My guess is you have a class containing a DateTime and a Client, something like:

class MyClass
{
   public DateTime Date {get; set;}
   public Client MyClient {get; set;}
}

The task would be then to override MyClass.ToString() and probably Client.ToString() to something like:

class Client
{
   public string Name {get; set;}
   public override ToString()
   { 
    return Name;
   }
}

class MyClass
{
   public DateTime Date {get; set;}
   public Client MyClient {get; set;}
   public override ToString()
   { 
    return string.Format("Client: {0}; Date: {1}", MyClient, Date);
   }
}
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