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I'm working on a CSS preprocessor, which means that I have the god power to decide what the output HTML will be. I wasn't able to find an information about how the browser apply styles to the elements in lower level. Which one is better?

Let's say that I have width: 100% and I have to apply this to several elements.

body { width: 100%; }
header { width: 100%; }
footer { width: 100%; }

This could be written like that as well:

body, header, footer { width: 100%; }

Which makes the size of the CSS lower. However, this also means that if I want to apply another style to the footer for example I'll end up with something like this:

body, header, footer { width: 100%; }
footer { font-size: 23px; }

And here is the question - the footer element is written twice in the CSS and is that mean that the browser will parse this slower then:

body, header { width: 100%; }
footer { width: 100%; font-size: 23px; }

I believe that combining of selectors is a good thing. However, when the preprocessor starts implementing this it will output styles like that:

.login-box { margin-top: 10px; }
.login-box { font-weight: bold; }

And that's because it thinks that there will be another element matching margin-top: 10px for example. So, is this a problem. I mean if I have a lot

.login-box { margin-top: 10px; }
.login-box { font-weight: bold; }

And not everything in one place:

.login-box { margin-top: 10px; font-weight: bold; }

P.S. the question is not about the specificity

==================== EDIT 01 ====================

Here is some SASS code:

%full-width {
   width: 100%;
}
%margin-reset {
   margin: 0;
}

body {
   @extend %full-width;
   @extend %margin-reset;
}

And the output is

body {
  width: 100%; 
}
body {
  margin: 0; 
}

So, the question is: is that actually correct. Isn't it better if the preprocessor outputs:

body { 
   width: 100%; 
   margin: 0; 
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This sounds like a bug in your preprocessor. You don’t need multiple CSS rules with the same selector, just combine them in your code.

Regarding size, calculate which version is smaller: with or without combined selectors? That depends on the case.

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Thanks for the answer @LeaVerou. I just edited my question (EDIT 01 part). Actually SASS currently produces such code, if you use place holders. The question was is there any difference for the browser and is it parses the CSS slower with such a code. –  Krasimir Aug 21 '13 at 20:49
    
Even if there is a difference, I’d guess it’s imperceptible. Your worry sounds a bit like premature optimization. –  Lea Verou Aug 22 '13 at 16:10
    
I guess you are right. Thanks. –  Krasimir Aug 22 '13 at 18:52

What you asked sounds more about CSS specificity. This tool may answer your questions, please review CSS Specificity calculator

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Thanks for the answer, but that's not what I was looking for. The specificity for the footer for example is the same (I'm referring the code above). The question is if the browser cares if it has to collects its styles from different sources and not only from one particular place. –  Krasimir Aug 21 '13 at 7:39
1  
@Krasimir - Yes it does collect, to all references you made. Please read for more info –  Sunil Kumar Aug 21 '13 at 9:22
    
Thanks @srk. That's really interesting thing. However I'm more interesting in CSS parsing model and if the browser matters matches of one selector with same specificity several times. –  Krasimir Aug 21 '13 at 10:11

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