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Regarding SEO, will Google detect and process a content inside <h1></h1>, hidden with the display:none CSS property?

HTML:

<header>
   <h1>
        <a><span>Title</span></a>
   </h1>
</header>

CSS:

header h1 a span{
    display: none;
}
header h1 a{
    display: inline-block;
    width: 300px;
    height: 50px;
    background: url('../img/image.png');
}
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closed as off-topic by Quentin, deceze, Tala, Jukka K. Korpela, John Conde Aug 21 '13 at 11:48

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6  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about Google's secret and frequently changing algorithms –  Quentin Aug 21 '13 at 7:16
1  
This youtube channel could be of interest for you: GoogleWebmasterHelp especially these two videos: Does Google still need text to understand my site? and Should I include my logo text using 'alt' or CSS? –  t.niese Aug 21 '13 at 8:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Google will disregard anything that's not displaying. Remember that Google works with the source code not the outcome, so anything you do in your source code except server side, is public.

Even if they detect displaying blue words on blue background, google will disregard that too or even punish for such technique.

Having a display:none is not so serious however, as we know that sometimes its use cannot be avoided. But sometimes there are better ways for swapping content than toggle() in jQ. Try to enhance your code to contain less or no non-displaying content, and it will be okay in SEO POV.

Rendering the page for the first time should return no non-displaying content, so Google will not detect a black hat trial. After that, you can do anything with JS, it wont affect SERP rankings.

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@drux google uses your css. They also do random sampling executing the initially running javascript code, to check if you e.g. use javascript to hide seo only content form the user. In my server logs i can also see that this includes ajax requests. –  t.niese Aug 21 '13 at 7:35
    
What about <img />? How is it semantic for crawlers? With alt text, I mean. –  bodruk Aug 21 '13 at 7:35
    
alt's importance used to be big, but for like 2 years, their use makes no sense –  Rápli András Aug 21 '13 at 7:36
    
Could it replace the text inside the <h1></h1>? With the same semantic effect? –  bodruk Aug 21 '13 at 7:39
1  
No, use alt if you are too zealous. h1 is the most important tag after title. –  Rápli András Aug 21 '13 at 7:41

The first thing you need to ask is "Does Googlebot know it's hidden?". To check this log into your server, and check the access logs (also available via cPanel or similar). For example, in Apache2.

grep Googlebot /var/log/apache2/access_log | grep "\.css"

If you don't see it downloading your CSS, then it doesn't know its hidden.

In searches, I stumbled upon some independent research that points to it indexing hidden content. I can't vouch for its soundness.

Googlebot isn't exactly smart. Until about a month ago, it was showing Flash Player Required text in summaries (even for YouTube).


When possible, put this text at the bottom of the body, which solves:

  • taking up cache space (100kb)
  • automatically on-top of other elements for absolute position purposes
  • less likely to be in summaries
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We shouldn't experiment with such black hat methods, if Google once realises that you have a smelly link tag pointing to a CSS that cannot be accessed, you're kicked out of SERPs no matter what. –  Rápli András Aug 21 '13 at 7:40
1  
I'm not saying to make it inaccessible. I'm saying that if Google chooses not to access it, there's no way for them to know. It's not a suggestion, but a logical observation. Personally, I believe that SEO is bad. You should make content and accessibility optimizations, and SEO is a byproduct. –  FakeRainBrigand Aug 21 '13 at 7:45

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