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I would like to ask for some simple examples showing the uses of <div> and <span>. I've seen them both used to mark a section of a page with an id or class, but I'm interested in knowing if there are times when one is preferred over the other.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 180 down vote accepted

div is a block element, span is inline.

This means that to use them semantically, divs should be used to wrap sections of a document, while spans should be used to wrap small portions of text, images, etc.

For example:

<div>This a large main division, with <span>a small bit</span> of spanned text!</div>

Note that it is illegal to place a block level element within an inline element, so:

<div>Some <span>text that <div>I want</div> to mark</span> up</div>

...is illegal.

You asked for some concrete examples, so is one taken from my bowling website, BowlSK:

<div id="header">
    <div id="userbar">
        Hi there, <span class="username">Chris Marasti-Georg</span> |
        <a href="/edit-profile.html">Profile</a> |
        <a href="http://www.bowlsk.com/_ah/logout?...">Sign out</a>
    </div>
    <h1><a href="/">Bowl<span class="sk">SK</span></a></h1>
</div>

Ok, what's going on? At the top of my page, I have a logical section, the "header". Since this is a section, I use a div, with appropriate id. Within that, I have a couple section - the user bar, and the actual page title. The title uses the appropriate tag, h1. The userbar, being a section, is wrapped in a div. Within that, the username is wrapped in a span, so that I can change the style. As you can see, I have also wrapped a span around 2 letters in the title - this allows me to change their color in my stylesheet.

Also note that HTML5 includes a broad new set of elements that define common page structures, such as article, section, nav, etc. Section 4.4 of the HTML 5 working draft lists them, and gives hints as to their usage. HTML5 is still a working spec, so nothing is "final" yet, but it is highly doubtful that any of these elements are going anywhere. There is a javascript hack that you will need to use if you want to style these elements in some older version of IE - you basically need to create one of each element using document.createElement before any of those elements are specified in your source. There are a bunch of libraries that will take care of this for you - a quick Google search turned up html5shiv.

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Chris, there's a mistake in your text: Even if you set the span's style to “block”, it's still illegal to wrap it around a block-level element! –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 8 '08 at 16:23
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You cannot use div and span semantically as they don't have any meaning attached to them. div is a meaningless generic block level elements while span is a meaningless generic inline element. –  apnerve Oct 17 '11 at 15:06
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@apnerve They still have semantics in that block vs. inline elements mean different things to document flow, both from a parsing perspective and from a "reading this source to figure out what is going on" perspective. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 17 '11 at 17:37
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"Semantics (from Greek sēmantiká, neuter plural of sēmantikós)[1][2] is the study of meaning. It focuses on the relation between signifiers, such as words, phrases, signs and symbols, and what they stand for, their denotata." The signifiers "div" and "span" most certainly stand for something. The HTML spec has a nice breakdown of what block and inline elements stand for. w3.org/TR/html401/struct/global.html#h-7.5.3. The HTML5 draft even puts them in separate groups - Grouping Content and Text-Level Semantics. dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 18 '11 at 13:30
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You had me at "div is a block element, span is inline. " :) –  Matical Jun 12 '13 at 1:28
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Just for the sake of completeness, I invite you to think about it like this:

  • There are lots of block elements (linebreaks before and after) defined in HTML, and lots of inline tags (no linebreaks).
  • But in modern HTML all elements are supposed to have meanings: a <p> is a paragraph, an <li> is a list item, etc., and we're supposed to use the right tag for the right purpose -- not like in the old days when we indented using <blockquote> whether the content was a quote or not.
  • So, what do you do when there is no meaning to the thing you're trying to do? There's no meaning to a 400px-wide column, is there? You just want your column of text to be 400px wide because that suits your design.
  • For this reason, they added two more elements to HTML: the generic, or meaningless elements <div> and <span>, because otherwise, people would go back to abusing the elements which do have meanings.
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This is a proper explanation. I wonder why this wasn't accepted as answer. –  apnerve Oct 17 '11 at 15:09
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because its too far down the page –  Jason Sebring Apr 1 '12 at 22:35
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Just because a good answer wasn't accepted, doesn't mean you can't vote it up. +1 for being useful clarification. –  CyberFonic Dec 24 '12 at 1:24
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<div> is a block-level element and <span> is an inline element.

If you wanted to do something with some inline text, <span> is the way to go since it will not introduce line breaks that a <div> would.


As noted by others, there are some semantics implied with each of these, most significantly the fact that a <div> implies a logical division in the document, akin to maybe a section of a document or something, a la:

<div id="Chapter1">
   <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, <span id="SomeSpecialText1">consectetuer adipiscing</span> elit. Duis congue vehicula purus.</p>
   <p>Nam <span id="SomeSpecialText2">eget magna nec</span> sapien fringilla euismod. Donec hendrerit.</p> 
</div>
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divs can be made inline (display:inline;) and vice versa for span but this is the best explanation. They are wrapper tags, span is usually used for sentences or highlighting text, div for sections. –  Ross Oct 8 '08 at 16:05
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I am aware of the fact that you can modify this with CSS, but that introduces another technology. HTML can stand on its own, and when it does, a div is not inline and it is not intended to be so in its pure form. –  Jason Bunting Oct 8 '08 at 16:09
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There are already good detailed answers here, but no visual examples, so here's a quick illustration:

difference between div and span

<div> is a block tag, while <span> is an inline tag.

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The real important difference is already mentioned in Chris' answer. However, the implications won't be obvious for everybody.

As an inline element, <span> may only contain other inline elements. The following code is therefore wrong:

<span><p>This is a paragraph</p></span>

The above code isn't valid. To wrap block-level elements, another block-level element must be used (such as <div>). On the other hand, <div> may only be used in places where block-level elements are legal.

Furthermore, these rules are fixed in (X)HTML and they are not altered by the presence of CSS rules! So the following codes are also wrong!

<span style="display: block"><p>Still wrong</p></span>
<span><p style="display: inline">Just as wrong</p></span>
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You said the above code isn't valid, but the browser runs it –  Faizan Mar 5 '13 at 11:25
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@Faizan How is that relevant? It’s also wrong: not every browser will produce consistent results for this markup. Depending on the doctype you use (and, again, the browser), this may not even run at all, and rather lead to a validation error. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 5 '13 at 13:38
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@Faizan The official one is pretty OK: validator.w3.org –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 6 '13 at 9:45
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"Be conservative in what you do and liberal in what you accept" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robustness_principle –  jldupont Mar 28 '13 at 13:37
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Welcome to the soup canteen. Browsers eating non-valid HTML is the very reason highly optimized but picky HTML parsers aren't the norm. Every browser worth its salt (i.e. compatible with the 'HTML' out there) uses a 'soup'-type (internal) library of some sort to make it palatable. –  ack Dec 9 '13 at 12:32
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As mentioned in other answers, by default div will be rendered as a block element, while span will be rendered inline within its context. But neither has any semantic value; they exist to allow you to apply styling and an identity to any given bit of content. Using styles, you can make a div act like a span and vice-versa.

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If they had no semantic value, there would be only one of them. One is meant to be a block level division - the other, an inline span –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 8 '08 at 16:11
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I would say that if you know a bit of spanish to look at this page, where is propperly explained.

Howerver, a fast definition would be that div is for dividing sections and span is for appliying some kind of style to an element within a div

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Div is a block element and span is an inline element and its width depends upon the content of it self where div does not

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protected by The New Idiot Nov 4 '13 at 15:26

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