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Why ?

I've set up an extremely simple server, like 50 times before, but this is my first try with Vagrant.

Current behaviour:

Vagrant VM shows "SSH-2.0-OpenSSH_5.9p1 Debian-5ubuntu1.1" in browser when navigating to "127.0.0.1:2222". 2222 is the standard port for the first Vagrant VM.

Expected behaviour:

127.0.0.1 should show the index.html/php of the apache2 web folder.

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So have you set Apache to listen on port 22 rather than ssh? Port 22 (forwarded to 2222) is the standard ssh port –  Mark Baker Aug 21 '13 at 10:06
    
I've setup the Vagrant demo box and not touched anything despite installing the basic needs, like apt-get apache2 and apt-get php5. –  Panique Aug 21 '13 at 10:07
    
Then when you use vagrant ssh you should find that is working on port 22, giving you shell access to the virtual machine –  Mark Baker Aug 21 '13 at 10:08
1  
When you run a vagrant up, you'll see a message showing [default] Forwarding ports... -- 22 => 2222 (adapter 1). ssh is listening on port 22 on your VM, you can ssh to port 22 (default) from your local box to connect to the VM; but if you have configured the VM to allow external access, then anyone else on another machine needs to use your IP address but port 2222 to connect to the VM –  Mark Baker Aug 21 '13 at 10:28
1  
Using a browser to connect to the SSH port 2222 will redirect to port 22 on the virtual box, but it's ssh that's listening on this port; and a web-browser isn't the right tool for an ssh connection –  Mark Baker Aug 21 '13 at 10:30

2 Answers 2

When you run a vagrant up, you'll see a message showing [default] Forwarding ports... -- 22 => 2222 (adapter 1). ssh is listening on port 22 on your VM, you can ssh to port 22 (default) from your local box to connect to the VM; but if you have configured the VM to allow external access, then anyone else on another machine needs to use your IP address but port 2222 to connect to the VM.

This might be useful if you ran the VM on a box in work, but wanted to be able to access it when you were at home, or in a client's office, or even from another machine in your work's network.

Using a browser to connect to the SSH port 2222 will redirect to port 22 on the virtual box, but it's ssh that's listening on this port; and a web-browser isn't the right tool for an ssh connection.

Personally I use putty as my ssh client, but with vagrant you can also issue a vagrant ssh after starting the virtual machine.

Additional

The values of port forwarding

If you set

config.vm.network :forwarded_port, guest: 80, host: 8080 
config.vm.network :forwarded_port, guest: 443, host: 8443 

in your vagrantFile, and you've allowed public access to the VM, then you can access the webserver on the VM from home, a client or another box in your work network by pointing the browser to port 8080 (or 8443 for https) rather than the more normal default ports 80 and 443... which can be particularly useful for running demos from a laptop that you can take to a client site while your VM is running on a bulky desktop under your desk in work

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MarkBaker's answer solves the problem, but Vagrant 1.2.7 (and newer) needs this syntax:

# Forward guest port 80 to host port 80
config.vm.forward_port 80, 80

The full Vagrantfile (you can find it where your box file is) would look like this:

Vagrant::Config.run do |config|
  # Forward guest port 80 to host port 80
  config.vm.forward_port 80, 80
end

This example would route a request on port 80 (standart port) in your host OS to port 80 in your Vagrant VM. The result is, http://127.0.0.1 in the host browser will show you the localhost of the VM.

When working with multiple VMs please notice that you should use a unique port for every VM.

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