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In my collision/physics engine, I know what spatial partitioning method I'm using at runtime, thanks to templates. I'm trying to create a generic Query class that allows me to perform the same queries on any spatial partitioning method. Every spatial partitioning method implements its own version of the query, but the interface is the same.

The problem is that the user has to specify the spatial partitioning type, the query type of the spatial partitioning type, and the query mode of the spatial partitioning type.

If the user were to change its spatial partitioning method, all the existing code would break.

Is there a way to allow the user to only specify the spatial partitioning type, a generic query type, and a generic query mode and have some kind of aliasing so that the correct type (relative to the spatial partitioning type) is selected automatically?

I've tried using (C++11 typedef) and decltype along with partial specializations, but I couldn't find a correct way to write the code and I never got it to compile/work.

I can only think about using virtual methods and a base class - but that seems unnecessary since I "know" the types at compile-time.


Current code:

 // Query.h
 template<class T, class U, class V>
 Query<T, U, V> getQuery() { return Query<T, U, V>(getSpatial<T>()); } 

 // Example.cpp (user project)
 getQuery<Grid, GridQueryType::Point, GridQueryMode::All>(); 
 getQuery<QuadTree, QuadTreeQueryType::Point, QuadTreeQueryMode::All>();

Desired code (not valid):

 // Query.h
 namespace Type { struct Point; }
 namespace Mode { struct All; }
 template<class T, class U, class V>
 Query<T, typename T::U, typename T::V> getQuery() 
 { 
      return Query<T, typename T::U, typename T::V>(getSpatial<T>()); 
 } 

 // Grid.h
 using Type::Point = GridQueryType::Point;
 using Mode::All = GridQueryMode::All;

 // QuadTree.h
 using Type::Point = QuadTreeQueryType::Point;
 using Mode::All = QuadTreeQueryMode::All;

 // Example.cpp (user project)
 getQuery<Grid, Type::Point, Mode::All>(); // actually uses GridQueryType::Point and GridQueryMode::All!
 getQuery<QuadTree, Type::Point, Mode::All>(); // actually uses QuadTreeQueryType::Point and QuadTreeQueryMode::All!

Real code also passes typename... TArgs to allow query-type-specific parameters - I excluded it from the example for space reasons.

share|improve this question
    
Can't you just simply specify return object type? for example: Query<Grid, Type::Point, Mode::All> retVal, and than retVal = getQuery(); after that specify another Query<QuadTree, Type::Point, Mode::All> retVal2 = getQuery(). – LukeCodeBaker Aug 21 '13 at 10:08
    
What about template template parameters? You pass a spatial partitioning class to the query, and the type of query (wich is a template template parameter). In the code, you apply the spatial method to the query type to get the needed query type – Manu343726 Aug 21 '13 at 10:08
    
@LukeCodeBaker - not sure I understand: a code example would help. – Vittorio Romeo Aug 21 '13 at 10:10
    
@Manu343726: I don't understand your solution either. Again, a code example would be useful. You mean using something like template<template<typename, typename> class TSpatial>? The problem is that Grid and QuadTree cannot be template classes. – Vittorio Romeo Aug 21 '13 at 10:12
    
@VittorioRomeo I just posted an answer – Manu343726 Aug 21 '13 at 10:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If there is a directly relationship from your first template parameter to the second and the third it seems the latter ones shouldn't be taken as template parameters but be determined from a type-map:

template <typename> struct TypePoint;
template <typename> struct ModeAll

template <> struct TypePoint<Grid> { typedef GridQueryType::Point type; };
template <> struct ModeAll<Grid>   { typedef GridQueryMode::All type; };

getQuery<Grid>();

At least, using a typemap as above you could define default values for the arguments. In case additional arguments are meant to follow, you could basically group the three first arguments together with their defaults into a type which is passed instead, e.g.:

template <typename T,
          typename P = typename TypePoint<T>::type,
          typename M = typename ModeAll<T>::type>
struct QueryParameters {
    typedef T type;
    typedef P point_type;
    typedef M mode_type;
};
getQuery<QueryParemeters<Grid>, Other, Paremters>();
share|improve this answer
    
This is on the right track. I tried something similar but without success earlier. The problem is that Point and All are not the only options available. For example, I would like to have Type::Point and Type::RayCast as generic types the user will type in its own project. Type::Point may redirect to GridType::Point or to QuadTreeType::Point. Type::RayCast may redirect to GridType::RayCast or QuadTreeType::RayCast, and so on. – Vittorio Romeo Aug 21 '13 at 10:19
    
Nevermind, this is perfect. I create a QueryTypeDispatcher<TSpatial, TType> to-specialize struct and a QueryModeDispatcher<TSpatial, TMode> to-specialize struct. – Vittorio Romeo Aug 21 '13 at 10:33

I think the solution here is a combination of template specialization and template template parameters.

Firts we define the different types of query:

namespace Type
{
    template<typename SPATIAL_PARTITION>
    struct Point;
}

namespace Mode
{
    template<typename SPATIAL_PARTITION>
    struct All;
}

Next, in each spatial partitionning implementation, we specialize the types and modes. For example, in Quadtree.h:

namespace Type
{
    template<>
    struct Point<Quadtree>
    {
        /* ... implementation here ... */
    }
}

namespace Mode
{
    template<>
    struct All<Quadtree>
    {
        /* ... implementation here ... */
    }
}

Finally, in the query we use template template parameters to specify the mode and type:

template<typename SPATIAL_PARTITION, template<typename> class TYPE , template<typename> class MODE>
void getQuery()
{
    using type = TYPE<SPATIAL_PARTITION>;
    using mode = MODE<SPATIAL_PARTITION>;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I understand now, thanks for the example. I'll try it out and report the outcome – Vittorio Romeo Aug 21 '13 at 10:21
    
@VittorioRomeo note that the problem you noticed in Dietmar's answer ("New modes and types should be provided by the user") is not a problem here. The user can define new modes and types, and specialise them for the spatial partition types, just like you have done. – Manu343726 Aug 21 '13 at 10:25

I would go in another direction. As you have got template function you could use type deduction. Return object depends on function template parameters. So instead of alias you could typedef returns types.

// Grid.h
//using Type::Point = GridQueryType::Point;
//    using Mode::All = GridQueryMode::All;
typedef Query<Grid, GridQueryType::Point, GridQueryMode::All> T_one;

// QuadTree.h
//using Type::Point = QuadTreeQueryType::Point;
//using Mode::All = QuadTreeQueryMode::All;

typedef Query<Grid, QuadTreeQueryType::Point, QuadTreeQueryMode::All> T_two;

// Example.cpp (user project)
//getQuery<Grid, Type::Point, Mode::All>(); // actually uses GridQueryType::Point and     
//getQuery<QuadTree, Type::Point, Mode::All>();
T_one t = getQuery();
T_two t2 = getQuery();
share|improve this answer

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