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I have the following code that perform hiearchical clustering and plot them in heatmap.

library(gplots)
set.seed(538)
# generate data
y <- matrix(rnorm(50), 10, 5, dimnames=list(paste("g", 1:10, sep=""), paste("t", 1:5, sep="")))
# the actual data is much larger that the above

# perform hiearchical clustering and plot heatmap
test <- heatmap.2(y)

Which plot this: enter image description here

What I want to do is to get the cluster member from each hierarchy of in the plot yielding:

Clust 1: g3-g2-g4
Clust 2: g2-g4
Clust 3: g4-g7
etc
Cluster last: g1-g2-g3-g4-g5-g6-g7-g8-g9-g10

Is there a way to do it?

share|improve this question
    
I thought I had the answer, but the results are not what I expected. You can spit out a matrix of cluster membership for the dendrogram of the rows using the following code: cutree(as.hclust(test$rowDendrogram), 1:dim(y)[1]) But the result does not agree with the heatmap dendrogram. Not sure why. Perhaps someone else can elucidate. –  Jean V. Adams Aug 21 '13 at 12:19
1  
It may be easier for people to answer your question in detail if you use set.seed(10) (or some number other than 10) right before you generate the data. Than we all have exactly the same data. –  zkurtz Aug 21 '13 at 13:21

2 Answers 2

This solution requires computing the cluster structure using a different packags:

# Generate data
y = matrix(rnorm(50), 10, 5, dimnames=list(paste("g", 1:10, sep=""), paste("t", 1:5, sep="")))
# The new packags:
library(nnclust)
# Create the links between all pairs of points with 
#   squared euclidean distance less than threshold
links = nncluster(y, threshold = 2, fill = 1, give.up =1) 
# Assign a cluster number to each point
clusters=clusterMember(links, outlier = FALSE)
# Display the points that are "alone" in their own cluster:
nas = which(is.na(clusters))
print(rownames(y)[nas])
clusters = clusters[-nas]
# For each cluster (with at least two points), display the included points
for(i in 1:max(clusters, na.rm = TRUE)) print(rownames(y)[clusters == i])

Obviously you would want to revise this into a function of some kind to be more user friendly. In particular, this gives the clusters at only one level of the dendrogram. To get the clusters at other levels, you would have to play with the threshold parameter.

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I did have the answer, after all! @zkurtz identified the problem ... the data I was using were different than the data you were using. I added a set.seed(538) statement to your code to stabilize the data.

Use this code to create a matrix of cluster membership for the dendrogram of the rows using the following code:

cutree(as.hclust(test$rowDendrogram), 1:dim(y)[1])

This will give you:

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
g1  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  1
g2  1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2  2
g3  1 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3  3
g4  1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2  4
g5  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4  5
g6  1 2 3 4 4 4 4 5 5  6
g7  1 2 2 2 2 5 5 6 6  7
g8  1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 7  8
g9  1 2 3 4 4 4 7 8 8  9
g10 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 9 10
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. What's the meaning of each value in the matrix? For example g9-9=8 . What does 8 mean here? –  neversaint Aug 21 '13 at 23:50
1  
There are 10 columns of numbers. The name of each column refers to the number of clusters (groups). And the numbers in each column identify which cluster the row is a member of. So, when the rows are grouped into 9 clusters, the 9th column gives the cluster number (1-9) into which each row is assigned. In this case, g1 is in cluster 1, g2 and g4 are in cluster 2, g3 is in cluster 3, g5 is in cluster 4, g6 is in cluster 5, ..., g9 is in cluster 8, and g10 is in cluster 9. –  Jean V. Adams Aug 22 '13 at 12:59

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