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I am creating a javascript class and in that I have this function which uses crypto module in node.js. I am not sure as to which would the best way to handle the callbacks. Take a look at the example and explain.

Users.prototype.makeSalt = function(callback){
      crypto.randomBytes(64, callback);
};

OR

Users.prototype.makeSalt = function(callback){
      crypto.randomBytes(64, function(err, buf){
           if (err) callback(err);
           callback(null, buf);
      });
};

Which one of these is the preferred method or considered best practice? In the first one I send the callback directly to the function defined in the module and let it handle the callback. In the second one I handle the callback myself by receiving the callback from the function. I feel the first one is preferred unless I need any customization. But I am very novice in my skills in node.js and javascript so wanted to know What are the other difference between the two approach and which would be preferred??

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Tom, Antti Haapala, smerny, LittleBobbyTables, Graviton Aug 22 '13 at 6:44

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Since the second function does the exact same thing as the first, the first is shorter and cleaner. If you need to manipulate the data before callbacking it then the second is the way to go. –  Andreas Hultgren Aug 21 '13 at 12:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd make the argument that it doesn't matter. If you need to change the call back implementation slightly you can proxy it through an inline as you have in option 2. If not, pass it straight on as in option 1.

The great thing about first class functions is that they provide this kind of flexibility. This means there isn't as many established rules of best practice but rather that solutions are appraised on their merit pertinent to the scenario at hand.

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First one is the cleaner and has got better readability

Users.prototype.makeSalt = function(callback){
      crypto.randomBytes(64, callback);
};

If you go and see the parameter which is passed to your callback function is the same i.e. 1st parameter err error object & 2nd parameter buf buffer. You actually should interfere only if you want to do something with those values. In your example you are not doing anything. So for you 1st is best & recommended.

For more information: Link

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