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I know this question has been asked time and again. I need random numbers between 0-9. I am using the following code:

srand(time());
int r;
for (;;)
{
    while(condition)
    {
        r = rand()%10;
        // ...
        // ...
    }
}

Now I am getting the same sequence of numbers for each iteration of for loop. Can someone provide me the correct code?

PS - My compiler doesn't recognize arcrandom().

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10  
Can you post your full code? There are lots of errors in this code, and you have obviously missed out some "unimportant" parts that might actually be the cause of the problem. If your code is too long to post, try to reduce it to the simplest example that reproduces the error. –  Mark Byers Dec 2 '09 at 21:32
2  
If you "know this question has been asked time and again", why do you ask it once more instead of looking up one of earlier answers? –  Tomek Szpakowicz Dec 2 '09 at 21:50
    
I looked up all the solutions but couldn't find a convincing answer. Why is everyone so emotional about this question. I have never got so many views so quickly ever!! –  Bruce Dec 2 '09 at 21:54
1  
What happens if you remove the call to srand()? (That's the same as calling srand(1)) –  pmg Dec 2 '09 at 22:00
2  
@Peter: sometimes the small space for comments (well, now it's 600 chars, but we still tend to be short :) makes it difficult to convey tone, so I wouldn't say anyone is being emotional here. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 2 '09 at 22:01

9 Answers 9

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This problem stems from the fact that on some implementations the lower-order bits of rand() are not very random. Quoting from the man page:

"If you want to generate a random integer between 1 and 10, you should always do it by using high-order bits, as in

j = 1 + (int) (10.0 * (rand() / (RAND_MAX + 1.0)));

and never by anything resembling

j = 1 + (rand() % 10);

(which uses lower-order bits)."

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I have tried it before..It doesn't work –  Bruce Dec 2 '09 at 21:35
2  
@Peter: Well, I can't help you then... You're probably doing something else wrong that you didn't notice and didn't copy into the example code you posted. There seems to be nothing else wrong with it. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 2 '09 at 21:48
    
You're probably right Martinho. I will look at my code again. Thank you for the answer –  Bruce Dec 2 '09 at 21:56
    
Are you calling srand once, and only once at application startup ? do not call srand more than once. –  nos Dec 2 '09 at 23:14

You're probably calling this function within the second, and srand is going to get seeded with the same second. You should only call srand once at the beginning of main.

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1  
A solution might be to use another seed source, such as a higher resolution timer. –  Raphaël Saint-Pierre Dec 2 '09 at 21:32
    
In the code srand is called only once and not inside the loop. That does not make the sequence repeat every iteration –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 2 '09 at 21:39
2  
Martinho, you know this how? It's called once inside the function it resides, which may or may not be main(). –  GManNickG Dec 2 '09 at 21:42
    
@GMan: it's not called inside the loop, so it won't repeat every iteration –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 2 '09 at 21:48
1  
I mean, Bruce is still correct to say srand should be called only once at the beginning of main. Otherwise problems will arise. It just won't cause the problem posed here. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 2 '09 at 21:58

Many pseudorandom generators have an observable period.
If you need a long period consider using the algorithm from Knuth 2. It has a period of about 2^55, and is simple to implement.
RANARRAY

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The lower-order bits of rand() do have a short period. But the OP says that working around that doesn't solve the problem... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 2 '09 at 22:30

Remove all srand() calls from your code.

Add one, unique call right before the first statement in main().

int main(void) {
    int foo = 42;
    int bar = baz(42);

    srand(time(0));
    /* rest of your program */
    return 0;
}
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Your code doesn't compile -- for() is not valid C.

Are you sure that you are calling srand only once, at the start of the program and before any rand calls? Calling srand within the loop would explain this behavior.

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The for loop has a condition inside it.It is not relevant to my question...Yes I am calling srand() only once, before any rand calls –  Bruce Dec 2 '09 at 21:32
    
@Peter: if it is not relevant, you can write it as for(;;) which is valid and won't upset anyone. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 2 '09 at 21:35
1  
My bad..I didn't mean to upset you –  Bruce Dec 2 '09 at 21:37
srand(time(0));

r = rand() % (max+1);

//r will be a random number between 0 and max.

I can only think that you did not initialize correctly, or your redacted code is redacted wrongly.

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2  
Oops! rand() % max+1 is different than rand() % (max+1). –  pmg Dec 2 '09 at 21:55
    
Durrr! That's what comes of fast typing. –  Paul Nathan Dec 2 '09 at 22:32
1  
The irony is "or your redacted code is redacted wrongly." –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 2 '09 at 23:44

Have you random()?

random() man page

I have made simple program:

int i;
for(i=0;i<40;i++)
printf("%d",rand()%10);

And geting 7938024839052273790239970398657627039991 - no repeating here. How long is your sequence?

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Depending on your requirements for statistical randomness you might find it better to ditch the psuedo random number generator and try an external source.

random.org and randomnumbers.info (amongst others) will provide truly random numbers for download, which libcurl should handle for you.

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The only possible way you could be getting the exact same sequence of numbers is if there is a call to srand() somewhere in the code that you haven't shown us. It could be deep within a function call somewhere.

The proper way to fix this would be to find the extra call to srand and remove it. However this quick hack might get you started:

static int seed = time();
int r;
for (;;)
{
    srand(seed++);
    while(condition)
    {
        r = rand()%10;
        // ...
        // ...
    }
}
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