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Im trying to perform a function on an array of data but Im not quite sure how to go about it,

here is my code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>

#define BUFFER_LEN 10
#define SAMPLE_RATE 48000
#define MAX_DELAY 0.25


int buffer_in[]= {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
int buffer_out[10];

short int flanger(float , float , int , short int );

int main(void)
{ 
int j,k,l;

    for (j = 0; j <=BUFFER_LEN; j++){
        buffer_out[j] = flanger(buffer_in[j]);    //this is causing the error
        printf("buffer out value = %d",buffer_out[j]);
        }

return 0;
}
// Flanger function

short int flanger(float range, float delay, int rate, short int inData){

  float flangerDelay; /* stores current delay required for flange effect */
  static int i=0;     /* keeps track of time for creating sweep waveform */
  static float sweepValue=0; /* keeps track of current sweep delay in ms */
  static int sweepFlag=1;    /* keeps track of waveform movement         */
  static int writePtr=0;     /* pointer to newest audio sample in buffer */
  static int readPtr=0;      /* pointer to oldest audio sample in buffer */
  float tmp; /* tmp value to see if dly will point to a position in buff */
  float delayArray[50];

  /* convert rate from Hz to Hz according to current sample rate    */
  /* NOTE: If it does not divise exact, take the integer part only! */

  /* is it time to change waveform? if not, increment counter */
  if (i >= rate) {
    /* has the maximum possible delay for sweep been reached? */
    if (sweepValue >= range)
      sweepFlag = 0; /* start the \ of triangular waveform */
    else if (sweepValue <= 0)
      sweepFlag = 1; /* start the / of triangular waveform */

    /* Is the waveform rising or falling? */
    if (sweepFlag==1)
      sweepValue += 0.001; /* increase sweep delay by .001 ms */
    else
      sweepValue -= 0.001; /* decrease sweep delay by .001 ms */

    /* reset i, to start count before waveform changes shape again */
    i=0;
  }
  else i++;

  /* Calculate the total current to delay (in ms, not samples!) */
  flangerDelay = sweepValue + delay;

  /* calculate delay in samples rather than in time */
  tmp = flangerDelay * 22.4f; //(float)(SAMPLE_RATE/1000);

  //printf("flangerDelay: %f samples: %d\n", flangerDelay, tmp);

  /* Calculate position of the read & write pointers */
  if (writePtr < (int)tmp )
    readPtr = (((SAMPLE_RATE/1000)*MAX_DELAY) - ((int)tmp - writePtr));
  else
    readPtr = writePtr - (int)tmp;

  /* has the write pointer reached end of delay buffer? */
  if (writePtr > ((SAMPLE_RATE/1000)*MAX_DELAY)) 
    writePtr=0;
  else
    writePtr++;

  /* now add current audio sample to array and return oldest sample */
  delayArray[writePtr] = inData;  

  /* is tmp a whole value? i.e. will it point to a sample in the buffer? */
  if (tmp > (int)tmp){
    /* not a whole number! therefore, interpolation is required! */
    if (readPtr == ((SAMPLE_RATE/1000) * MAX_DELAY))
      return((delayArray[readPtr] + delayArray[0])/2);
    else
      return((delayArray[readPtr] + delayArray[readPtr+1])/2);
  }
  else {
    /* is a whole number! therefore, can take straight from buffer! */
    return delayArray[readPtr];
  }

}

i get the error at this part

for (j = 0; j <=BUFFER_LEN; j++){
        buffer_out[j] = flanger(buffer_in[j]);    //this is causing the error
        printf("buffer out value = %d",buffer_out[j]);
        }

basically i want to perform the function on the data in buffer_in and put that result into buffer_out have i got it set up wrong? many thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
    
"this is causing the error"... and what exactly is the error? –  abelenky Aug 21 '13 at 14:19
    
You need to pass range, delay, and rate to the call as well as the array entry. It doesn't have anything to do with arrays at all. See my answer (2nd). –  Jiminion Aug 21 '13 at 14:28

4 Answers 4

You declare the flanger function to take four arguments, but pass only one argument when calling it. You must call it with the correct number of arguments, or change the function to take only a single argument.

share|improve this answer

If you want to pass an array to flanger, you must declare it to accept an array:

short int flanger(int aBuffer[]){

Instead, you declared it to take 4 different parameters.

share|improve this answer

You need something like this. But it's hard to specify further as your code is too far from what you seem to want.

void flanger(int buf_out[], int buf_in[], float range, float delay, int rate, short int inData)

Maybe you just need:

buffer_out[j] = flanger(range_val, delay_val, rate_val,buffer_in[j])
share|improve this answer

Perhaps using an array of struct will serve you better? Something like: (should build as is in ANSI C)

#include <windows.h>
#include <ansi_c.h>

    typedef struct  {
        float range;
        float delay;
        int rate;
        short inData;
    } PARAMS;

    PARAMS params[10], *pParams;

    void flanger(PARAMS *p);

    void main(void)
    {
        int i;
        pParams = &params[0];

        for(i=0;i<10;i++)
        {
            pParams[i].range = 45.0 + (float)i;
            pParams[i].delay = .003 + (float)i;
            pParams[i].rate = 23 + i;
            pParams[i].inData = 1 + i;
        }


        flanger(pParams);

    }

    void flanger(PARAMS *p)
    {
        //do something with params      
    }

[EDIT to show two struct * arguments]
This should build and run in an ANSI C compiler, just copy and paste:

#include <windows.h>
#include <ansi_c.h>

typedef struct  {
    float range;
    float delay;
    int rate;
    short inData;
} PARAMS;

#define DATESIZE 10

void flanger(PARAMS *o, PARAMS *i);

void main(void)
{
    int i;
    PARAMS out[DATESIZE], *pOut, in[DATESIZE], *pIn;

    pOut = &out[0];
    pIn = &in[0];


    printf("Out Data\n");
    printf("Range    Delay    Rate    InData\n");
    for(i=0;i<DATESIZE;i++)
    {
        pOut[i].range = 45.0 + (float)i;
        pOut[i].delay = .003 + (float)i;
        pOut[i].rate = 23 + i;
        pOut[i].inData = 1 + i;
        printf("%4.2f    %5.3f    %d    %d\n", 
                pOut[i].range,
                pOut[i].delay,
                pOut[i].rate,
                pOut[i].inData);
    }


    flanger(pOut, pIn); 

    printf("In Data\n");
    printf("Range    Delay    Rate    InData\n");
    for(i=0;i<DATESIZE;i++)
    {
        printf("%4.2f    %5.3f    %d    %d\n", 
                pIn[i].range,
                pIn[i].delay,
                pIn[i].rate,
                pIn[i].inData);
    }
    getchar();
}

void flanger(PARAMS *out, PARAMS *in)
{
    int i;
    //process "out", pass back "in"
    for(i=0;i<DATESIZE;i++)
    {
        in[i].range = pow(out[i].range, 2.0); 
        in[i].delay = pow(out[i].delay, 2.0);  
        in[i].rate = pow(out[i].rate, 2.0); 
        in[i].inData = pow(out[i].inData, 2.0);
    }


}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but structures are waaaaay over my head at the moment! –  user2459764 Aug 21 '13 at 21:10
    
Okay - I was there once too, no problem. But in case you change your mind, the sample code I left is complete and will build and run in an ANSI C compiler. You can use break points to view the values as it goes through its loops. Using a regular (non-struct) array requires all the elements be of the same type, structs allow for multiple types. :) –  ryyker Aug 22 '13 at 16:06
    
Thanks, I see what you mean. Would it be possible to pass an array of samples through the above code and obtain an array of effected samples as the result? –  user2459764 Aug 23 '13 at 16:40
    
Yes, That is the real power of arrays of structs. They pass as pointers very easily. The example I left above is an example of how to set up for what you are asking, I think. I will edit my answer with new code, similar to the first, but showing how seperate copies of the same struct can be used to contain original values, and modified values. Keep in mind, you can also just pass one, let the function modify its values, and when the function returns, the struct will contain the modified values. –  ryyker Aug 23 '13 at 23:53
    
thanks so much for that code, it runs no problem and i can see the data result. I need to study it now an understand how it works, then try and push my own values through it - its just pushing random values at the moment i take it? thanks! –  user2459764 Aug 25 '13 at 18:52

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