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I'm adding code to a large JSP web application, integrating functionality to convert CGM files to PDFs (or PDFs to CGMs) to display to the user.

It looks like I can create the converted files and store them in the directory designated by System.getProperty("java.io.tmpdir"). How do I manage their deletion, though? The program resides on a Linux-based server. Will the OS automatically delete from /tmp or will I need to come up with functionality myself? If it's the latter scenario, what are good ways to go about doing it?

EDIT: I see I can use deleteOnExit() (relevant answer elsewhere), but I think the JVM runs more or less continuously in the background so I'm not sure if the exits would be frequent enough.

I don't think I need to cache any converted files--just convert a file anew every time it's needed.

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The program resides on a Linux-based server. Will the OS automatically delete from /tmp? This folder will be cleaned when you restart the server. I recommend doing this with a cron, note that the cron can be directly set in your Linux env or from Java using a library like quartz. –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 21 '13 at 14:52
    
Excellent, I believe the program I am working on already uses quartz. What if, though, for instance, someone decides to go on a run and over the course of a week generates a thousand plus 10 MB PDFs? How do I handle that case? –  slothario Aug 21 '13 at 14:58
    
That's a different problem, but you can create a rule to validate that there's no more space to create a file (of course there is but not allowed for these files) and show a message to users. Don't give too much freedom to users about some functionalities of your application or you will end having much problems than before –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 21 '13 at 15:00
    
What do you mean, exactly? (Also, could I just create something that checks to see if the size of my files exceeds a certain amount, and then deletes the oldest ones if that's true? Or am I overthinking it?) –  slothario Aug 21 '13 at 15:02
    
It depends. I would start defining policies about how and when to create and delete the files. For example, if the files won't be needed after its usage (loaded into memory), then they can be deleted directly (as shown in one of the answers), but if you need them to still remain in disk for concurrent access to the same files, then the file must live for a longer time than expected. A policy I defined in a similar functional requirement was that the file cannot live more than 10 mins if not used/modified. But again, it depends of your requirement. –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 21 '13 at 15:05

3 Answers 3

You can do this

File file = File.createTempFile("base_name", ".tmp", new File(temporaryFolderPath));
file.deleteOnExit();

the file will be deleted when the virtual machine terminates

Edit:

If you want to delete it after the job is done, just do it:

File file = null;
try{
   file = File.createTempFile("webdav", ".tmp", new File(temporaryFolderPath));
   // do sth with the file
}finally{
   file.delete();
}
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Yes, but it's a more or less continuously running web application. I'm not sure how often it would exit. I worry about gigs and gigs accumulating between exits. Or is that not a problem? –  slothario Aug 21 '13 at 14:54
    
This means that you have to shutdown the entire Java application server in order to the files to be deleted –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 21 '13 at 14:54

There are ways to have the JVM delete files when the JVM exits using deleteOnExit() but I think there are known memory leaks using that method. Here is a blog explaining the leak: http://www.pongasoft.com/blog/yan/java/2011/05/17/file-dot-deleteOnExit-is-evil/

A better solution would either be to delete old files using a cron or if you know you aren't going to use the file again, why not just delete it after processing?

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From your comment :

Also, could I just create something that checks to see if the size of my files exceeds a certain amount, and then deletes the oldest ones if that's true? Or am I overthinking it?

You could create a class that keeps track of the created files with a size limit. When the size of the created files, after creating a new one, goes over the limit, it deletes the oldest one. Beware that this may delete a file that still needs to exist even if it is the oldest one. You might need a way to know which files still need to be kept and delete only those that are not needed anymore.

You could have a timer in the class to check periodically instead of after each creation. This solution is tied to your application while using a cron isn't.

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