Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a lot of data, usually in a file. I want to compute some quantities so I have this kind of functions:

def mean(iterator):
    n = 0
    sum = 0.
    for i in iterator:
      sum += i
      n += 1
    return sum / float(n)

I have also many other similar functions (var, size, ...)

Now I have an iterator iterating throught the data: iter_data. I can compute all the quantities I want: m = mean(iter_data); v = var(iter_data) and so on, but the problem is that I am iterating many times and this is expensive in my case. Actually the I/O is the most expensive part.

So the question is: can I compute my quantities m, v, ... iterating only one time over iter_data keeping separate the functions mean, var, ... so that it is easy to add new ones?

What I need is something similar to boost::accumulators

share|improve this question
1  
johndcook.com/standard_deviation.html –  Mr E Aug 21 '13 at 15:12
1  
You could bundle all your functions into one function with one loop and return a dictionary of all the computed values, like {'mean':2.7, 'var':0.2, 'size':27}, etc. –  Brionius Aug 21 '13 at 15:14
    
@MrE: no, in your solution your are not keeping separate the function, but you are computing the mean and the variance in the same function –  Ruggero Turra Aug 21 '13 at 15:14
    
@Brionius, same problem. As I said in the question: keeping separate the functions –  Ruggero Turra Aug 21 '13 at 15:15
1  
is your data too big to fit into memory? Otherwise iterating will probably be fast and you can use e.g. numpy. –  dastrobu Aug 21 '13 at 15:17

4 Answers 4

For example use objects and callbacks like:

class Counter():
    def __init__(self):
        self.n = 0
    def __call__(self, i):
        self.n += 1

class Summer():
    def __init__(self):
        self.sum = 0
    def __call__(self, i):
        self.sum += i


def process(iterator, callbacks):
    for i in iterator:
        for f in callbacks: f(i)

counter = Counter()
summer = Summer()
callbacks = [counter, summer]
iterator = xrange(10) # testdata
process(iterator, callbacks)

# process results from callbacks
n = counter.n
sum = summer.sum

This is easily extendible and iterates the data only once.

share|improve this answer

You can use itertools.tee and generator magic (I say magic because it's not exactly nice and readable):

import itertools

def mean(iterator):
    n = 0
    sum = 0.
    for i in iterator:
         sum += i
         n += 1
         yield
    yield sum / float(n)

def multi_iterate(funcs, iter_data):
    iterators = itertools.tee(iter_data, len(funcs))
    result_iterators = [func(values) for func, values in zip(funcs, iterators)]
    for results in itertools.izip(*result_iterators):
        pass
    return results

mean_result, var_result = multi_iterate([mean, var], iter([10, 20, 30]))

print(mean_result)    # 20.0

By the way, you can write mean in a simpler way:

def mean(iterator):
    total = 0.
    for n, item in enumerate(iterator, 1):
         total += i
         yield
    yield total / n

You shouldn't name variables sum because that shadows the built-in function with the same name.

share|improve this answer

Without classes, you could adapt the following:

def my_mean():
    total = 0.
    length = 0
    while True:
        val = (yield)
        if val is not None:
            total += val
            length += 1
        else:
            yield total / length

def my_len():
    length = 0
    while True:
        val = (yield)
        if val is not None:
            length += 1
        else:
            yield length

def my_sum():
    total = 0.
    while True:
        val = (yield)
        if val is not None:
            total += val
        else:
            yield total


def process(iterable, **funcs):
    fns = {name:func() for name, func in funcs.iteritems()}
    for fn in fns.itervalues():
        fn.send(None)
    for item in iterable:
        for fn in fns.itervalues():
            fn.send(item)
    return {name:next(func) for name, func in fns.iteritems()}


data = [1, 2, 3]
print process(data, items=my_len, some_other_value=my_mean, Total=my_sum)
# {'items': 3, 'some_other_value': 2.0, 'Total': 6.0}
share|improve this answer

What you want is to have a main Calc class that iterates over the data applying different calculation for mean, var, etc and then can return those values through an interface. You could make it more generic by letting calculations register themselves with this class before the main calculation and then have their results available through new accessors in the interface.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.