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I have a file that is formatted like this:

> ABC
1
2
> DEF
3
4

I would like to use tr to replace each > with 4 carriage returns, so it looks like:

 ABC
1
2




 DEF
3
4

I tried the following in the Terminal: cat input | tr ">" "\n\n\n\n" > output However, this only adds one carriage return between the two blocks of data, like this:

 ABC
1
2

 DEF
3
4

How can I get it to recognize the multiple carriage returns? Thanks!

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In unix-format text files (which you seem to be dealing with), line breaks are represented by linefeeds (aka newlines or /n or ^J), not carriage returns (\r or ^M). –  Gordon Davisson Aug 21 '13 at 16:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

tl;dr

tr is the wrong tool for the job; try something else (like sed)


tr (text replace) only does 1:1 replacement - so it will only replace one character, with another, at a time. I think your current command replaces > with /n, >> with /n/n, >>> with /n/n/n and >>>> with /n/n/n/n.

try using sed instead, probably something like this (untested!):

cat input | sed $'s/>/\\\n\\\n\\\n\\\n/g' > output
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1  
OS X's version of sed doesn't interpret escape sequences like \n, but you can use $'...' to make the shell interpret them before handing them to sed. And then you have to escape the newlines to keep sed happy, and escape those escapes to get the shell to pass them through... it ends up looking like this: sed $'s/>/\\\n\\\n\\\n\\\n/g' input >output –  Gordon Davisson Aug 21 '13 at 16:50
1  
yes or use the equivalent in awk, that does understand \n chars, i.e. cat input | awk '{printf("%s\n\n\n\n", $0)}' (untested, but close). .... Good luck to all. –  shellter Aug 21 '13 at 17:18
    
@GordonDavisson thanks! –  blueberryfields Aug 21 '13 at 17:44

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