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This may be a stupid idea. I am trying to write a SQL*Plus .sql script that I can call from a Windows batch file that itself generates a new .sql script using dbms_output.put_line. This is what I have so far for my script:

set echo off;
set serverout on;

conn user@pass;

spool E:\new_script.sql

DECLARE

  CURSOR c_groups IS
    SELECT * FROM table;

  s varchar2(4000);

BEGIN

  dbms_output.put_line('BEGIN');

  FOR x IN c_groups LOOP
    s := 'INSERT INTO TABLE blah VALUES ('''||x.name||''','||x.id||');';
  END LOOP;

  dbms_output.put_line(s);

  dbms_output.put_line('COMMIT;');

  dbms_output.put_line('END;');
  dbms_output.put_line('/');

END;
/

spool off;
exit;

However, when I do this, my new_script.sql just says "PL/SQL procedure successfully completed." Any ideas how to make the dbms_out.put_line actually display their message?

And I'm not actually doing this to build insert statements - those are just a simple sample showing the gist of what I'm trying to do.

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2 Answers 2

  1. You have to connect first and then use SET command. So your three commands should be in

    this order:

    conn user@pass;
    set echo off;
    set serverout on;
    

    Otherwise, serveroutput parameter will be set to its default

    value, which is OFF and that the reason why dbms_output.put_line()

    hasn't been working as expected.

  2. You should execute dbms_output.put_line(s) inside the FOR loop:

    FOR x IN c_groups LOOP
       s := 'INSERT INTO TABLE blah VALUES ('''||x.name||''','||x.id||');';
       dbms_output.put_line(s);
    END LOOP;
    

    Moreover it's redundant to spool BEGIN .. END block. The DML statements

    (bunch of INSERT INTO statements in this case) terminated by semicolon will be

    executed just fine without being included in the BEGIN END block.

  3. As you run your script using *.bat file, It probably will be useful to use the

    following commands:

    set feedback off;  -- To not spool messages like 
                       -- PL/SQL procedure successfully completed
    
    set termout off;   -- to suppress the output from a command line.
    
  4. Your approach could probably be boiled down to a simple SELECT statement:

    conn user@pass;
    
    set echo off;
    set serverout on;
    set feedback off;
    set termout off;
    set heading off;
    
    spool E:\new_script.sql
    
    SELECT 'INSERT INTO TABLE blah VALUES ('''||name||'''','||to_char(id)||');'
     FROM table;
    
    spool off;
    
    exit;
    
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+1 But adding the BEGIN and END; may be a very good idea. On a slow network, processing one PL/SQL block will be significantly faster than processing many SQL statements. Although that approach will generate DIANA errors if the PL/SQL block is ginormous. –  Jon Heller Aug 21 '13 at 18:34
    
1) I don't think it matters whether you CONN before or after SET. My SET ECHO ON was working in both places. 2) In real life, the dbms_output call was inside the loop; that was a transcription error. Also, the inside of my loop involves function calls that set a variable, so that is why I had the BEGIN and END in there. 3) Those would be useful, thanks. 4) This goes back to #2, in that I was going more processing within the loop. I probably could have done without the anonymous BEGIN..END block wrapping the whole thing. I ended up using UTL_FILE though, but thanks for looking at it. –  Tom Aug 21 '13 at 18:57
    
@Tom It does matter for serveroutput parameter. It doesn't matter for echo parameter. –  Nicholas Krasnov Aug 21 '13 at 19:04

SPOOL sends the results to a file; but it doesn't ensure that results are printed. To enable the printing to stdout; use the SERVEROUTPUT command.

set serveroutput on

This is generally a poor way of going about things; I recognise that you said this wasn't what you're actually doing but SQL is a set based language. Do things in bulk if at all possible.

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