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Do you know if using double quotes instead of single quotes in ruby decreases performance in any meaningful way in ruby 1.8 and 1.9.

so if I type

question = 'my question'

is it faster than

question = "my question"

I imagine that ruby tries to figure out if something needs to be evaluated when it encounters double quotes and probably spends some cycles doing just that.

share|improve this question
15  
Run it a half million times and see. Chances are, your site doesn't get nearly enough traffic to matter. Premature optimisation is generally not worth it. –  ceejayoz Dec 2 '09 at 22:59
36  
why do so many people expect ruby only to be used for web programing? –  johannes Dec 3 '09 at 23:14
11  
I wouldn't consider this premature optimization. More of a "best practice" since going back after your app is complete and optimizing for either single or double would be a massive headache. –  Omar Dec 5 '09 at 0:08
5  
For me it is just style: I use single quotes for 'static' strings and double qoutes (or other interpolated strings) in other cases. –  tig Oct 3 '10 at 21:13
3  
@Baddie: It is premature optimization if you are optimizing away a problem that doesn't exist. –  Andy Lester Oct 18 '10 at 20:33

14 Answers 14

up vote 56 down vote accepted
$ ruby -v
ruby 1.9.3p0 (2011-10-30 revision 33570) [x86_64-darwin11.0.0]

$ cat benchmark_quotes.rb
# As of Ruby 1.9 Benchmark must be required
require 'benchmark'

n = 1000000
Benchmark.bm(15) do |x|
  x.report("assign single") { n.times do; c = 'a string'; end}
  x.report("assign double") { n.times do; c = "a string"; end}
  x.report("concat single") { n.times do; 'a string ' + 'b string'; end}
  x.report("concat double") { n.times do; "a string " + "b string"; end}
end

$ ruby benchmark_quotes.rb 

                      user     system      total        real
assign single     0.110000   0.000000   0.110000 (  0.116867)
assign double     0.120000   0.000000   0.120000 (  0.116761)
concat single     0.280000   0.000000   0.280000 (  0.276964)
concat double     0.270000   0.000000   0.270000 (  0.278146)

Note: I've updated this to make it work with newer Ruby versions, and cleaned up the header, and run the benchmark on a faster system.

This answer omits some key points. See especially these other answers concerning interpolation and the reason there is no significant difference in performance when using single vs. double quotes.

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1  
No interpolation? –  Erik Escobedo Aug 20 '10 at 17:19
    
see madlep's answer below –  zetetic Aug 20 '10 at 17:53
    
Am I interpreting the results correctly? Assignment using double quotes is actually faster than single? How can this be? –  randomguy Oct 3 '10 at 12:28
    
Apparently yes, though the difference is minor. As to why -- beats me. –  zetetic Oct 4 '10 at 0:27
4  
The measured differences are not meaningful. Just the order (because of garbage collection) can make important a difference. There is no runtime difference between ' and " as they are parsed to the same thing. –  Marc-André Lafortune Aug 1 '12 at 16:25

Summary: no speed difference; this great collaborative ruby style guide recommends being consistent. I now use 'string' unless interpolation is needed (option A in the guide) and like it, but you will typically see more code with "string".

Details:

Theoretically, it can make a difference when your code is parsed, but not only should you not care about parse time in general (negligible compared to execution time), you won't be able to find a significant difference in this case.

The important thing is that when is gets executed it will be exactly the same.

Benchmarking this only shows a lack of understanding of how Ruby works. In both cases, the strings will get parsed to a tSTRING_CONTENT (see the source in parse.y). In other words, the CPU will go through the exact same operations when creating 'string' or "string". The exact same bits will flip the exact same way. Benchmarking this will only show differences that are not significant and due to other factors (GC kicking in, etc.); remember, there can't be any difference in this case! Micro benchmarks like these are difficult to get right. See my gem fruity for a decent tool for this.

Note that if there is interpolation of the form "...#{...}...", this gets parsed to a tSTRING_DBEG, a bunch of tSTRING_DVAR for the each expression in #{...} and a final tSTRING_DEND. That's only if there is interpolation, though, which is not what the OP is about.

I used to suggest you use double quotes everywhere (makes it easier to actually add that #{some_var} later on), but I now use single quotes unless I need interpolation, \n, etc... I like it visually and it's slightly more explicit, since there's no need to parse the string to see if it contains any expression.

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2  
Seems much more important that the minute performance difference. Double quotes it is! –  Venkat D. Mar 7 '11 at 23:25
    
Thanks for pointing me at your answer. Could you clarify why you are saying that benchmarking this is misleading? I agree the differences are probably negligible but is the benchmark in some way wrong? (Someone already highlighted the #{n} would be doing number conversion). Is it not showing the differences in parsing?. –  PhilT Nov 20 '12 at 21:20
1  
Thanks for linking to the style guide. Can't believe I didn't come across that before. –  PhilT Nov 20 '12 at 21:25
1  
@PhilT: Answer edited –  Marc-André Lafortune Nov 21 '12 at 4:33
    
The style guide mentioned in your answer has been updated to suggest adopting a consistent style, whether single or double quotes, and indicates that double quoted strings are more prevalent in the Ruby community. –  philtr Apr 25 at 18:59

No one happened to measure concatenation vs interpolation though:

$ ruby -v
ruby 1.8.7 (2008-08-11 patchlevel 72) [i686-darwin9.6.2]
$ cat benchmark_quotes.rb
require 'benchmark'
n = 1000000
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("assign single") { n.times do; c = 'a string'; end}
  x.report("assign double") { n.times do; c = "a string"; end}
  x.report("assing interp") { n.times do; c = "a string #{'b string'}"; end}
  x.report("concat single") { n.times do; 'a string ' + 'b string'; end}
  x.report("concat double") { n.times do; "a string " + "b string"; end}
end

$ ruby -w benchmark_quotes.rb 
      user     system      total        real
assign single  2.600000   1.060000   3.660000 (  3.720909)
assign double  2.590000   1.050000   3.640000 (  3.675082)
assing interp  2.620000   1.050000   3.670000 (  3.704218)
concat single  3.760000   1.080000   4.840000 (  4.888394)
concat double  3.700000   1.070000   4.770000 (  4.818794)

Specifically, note assign interp = 2.62 vs concat single = 3.76. As icing on the cake, I also find interpolation to be more readable than 'a' + var + 'b' especially with regard to spaces.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. This is the only interpolation benchmark that's comparing apples with apples. –  Mark Thomas Feb 11 '11 at 12:00
    
Benchmarking can be misleading; see my answer for why. As for comparison between concatenation and interpolation, it should be obvious that interpolation can not be slower than concatenation. In any case, that is not really part of the question! –  Marc-André Lafortune Aug 1 '12 at 16:45
    
Can you add << to this test? –  Nick Aug 28 '13 at 13:07

No difference - unless you're using #{some_var} style string interpolation. But you only get the performance hit if you actually do that.

Modified from Zetetic's example:

require 'benchmark'
n = 1000000
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("assign single") { n.times do; c = 'a string'; end}
  x.report("assign double") { n.times do; c = "a string"; end}
  x.report("assign interp") { n.times do; c = "a #{n} string"; end}  
  x.report("concat single") { n.times do; 'a string ' + 'b string'; end}
  x.report("concat double") { n.times do; "a string " + "b string"; end}
  x.report("concat interp") { n.times do; "a #{n} string " + "b #{n} string"; end}
end

output

               user       system     total    real
assign single  0.370000   0.000000   0.370000 (  0.374599)
assign double  0.360000   0.000000   0.360000 (  0.366636)
assign interp  1.540000   0.010000   1.550000 (  1.577638)
concat single  1.100000   0.010000   1.110000 (  1.119720)
concat double  1.090000   0.000000   1.090000 (  1.116240)
concat interp  3.460000   0.020000   3.480000 (  3.535724)
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Interpolation looks a bit more expensive. Was this 1.8? It would be nice to see if 1.9 changes anything. –  zetetic Dec 4 '09 at 0:20
    
zetetic - yup. This was against Ruby 1.8.7 –  madlep Dec 4 '09 at 3:29
1  
The interp version is both interpolating and concatenating plus converting a number to a string twice. Interpolation wins if you make the results the same. See gist.github.com/810463. The real takeaway is to worry more about to_s than single or double quotes. –  Brian Deterling Feb 3 '11 at 23:37
    
Benchmarking this only can be misleading and shows a misunderstanding of how Ruby works. See my answer. –  Marc-André Lafortune Aug 1 '12 at 16:35

Thought I'd add a comparison of 1.8.7 and 1.9.2. I ran them a few times. Variance was about +-0.01.

require 'benchmark'
n = 1000000
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("assign single") { n.times do; c = 'a string'; end}
  x.report("assign double") { n.times do; c = "a string"; end}
  x.report("assign interp") { n.times do; c = "a #{n} string"; end}
  x.report("concat single") { n.times do; 'a string ' + 'b string'; end}
  x.report("concat double") { n.times do; "a string " + "b string"; end}
  x.report("concat interp") { n.times do; "a #{n} string " + "b #{n} string"; end}
end

ruby 1.8.7 (2010-08-16 patchlevel 302) [x86_64-linux]

assign single  0.180000   0.000000   0.180000 (  0.187233)
assign double  0.180000   0.000000   0.180000 (  0.187566)
assign interp  0.880000   0.000000   0.880000 (  0.877584)
concat single  0.550000   0.020000   0.570000 (  0.567285)
concat double  0.570000   0.000000   0.570000 (  0.570644)
concat interp  1.800000   0.010000   1.810000 (  1.816955)

ruby 1.9.2p0 (2010-08-18 revision 29036) [x86_64-linux]

  user          system      total      real
assign single  0.140000   0.000000   0.140000 (  0.144076)
assign double  0.130000   0.000000   0.130000 (  0.142316)
assign interp  0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.656088)
concat single  0.370000   0.000000   0.370000 (  0.370663)
concat double  0.370000   0.000000   0.370000 (  0.370076)
concat interp  1.420000   0.000000   1.420000 (  1.412210)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for looking at variance. –  Andrew Grimm Oct 18 '10 at 22:12
    
Interp is having to do number to string conversions. See gist.github.com/810463. –  Brian Deterling Feb 4 '11 at 17:50
    
See my answer as to why you get these numbers. –  Marc-André Lafortune Aug 1 '12 at 16:34
    
Good point on the Interp. I'd just copied the previous answer as a basis for mine. That'll teach me. –  PhilT Nov 20 '12 at 21:12

Single quotes can be very slightly faster than double quotes because the lexer doesn't have to check for #{} interpolation markers. Depending on implementation, etc. Note that this is a parse-time cost, not a run-time cost.

That said, the actual question was whether using double quoted strings "decreases performance in any meaningful way", to which the answer is a decisive "no". The difference in performance is so incredibly small that it is completely insignificant compared to any real performance concerns. Don't waste your time.

Actual interpolation is a different story, of course. 'foo' will be almost exactly 1 second faster than "#{sleep 1; nil}foo".

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3  
+1 for noting that the cost is at compile time not at run time, so the highly-voted benchmark-based answers above are misleading. –  nohat Dec 4 '11 at 20:07

There is no significant difference in either direction. It would have to be huge for it to matter.

Except for times when you are sure that there is an actual problem with timing, optimize for programmer maintainability.

The costs of machine time are very very small. The costs of programmer time to write code and maintain it is huge.

What good is an optimization to save seconds, even minutes of runtime over thousands of runs if it means that the code is harder to maintain?

Pick with a style and stick with it but do not pick that style based on statistically insignificant milliseconds of runtime.

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Double quotes take twice as many key strikes to type than single quotes. I'm a man in a hurry. I use single quotes. :) And yes, I consider that a "performance gain". :)

share|improve this answer
    
Why would double quotes take 2x the key strikes? They are both represented by a single key. Additionally, many IDEs add the closing quote(s) automatically. –  Matt Dressel Jul 30 '13 at 18:20
    
Even if the IDE automatically closes the quote, double quotes still require 100% more key strikes. ;-) –  Clint Pachl Aug 24 '13 at 2:32
    
Matt Dressel: double quotes requires twice the number of key strikes because you need to strike the shift key as well. Oh: :) just in case you missed it in my original comment. :) Corded keys require more effort and arguably, more time, to execute. :) –  aqn Aug 30 '13 at 15:26

It's certainly possible depending on the implementation, but the scanning portion of the interpreter should only look at each character once. It will need just an additional state (or possible set of states) and transitions to handle #{} blocks.

In a table based scanner thats going to be a single lookup to determine transition, and will be happening for each character anyways.

When the parser gets the scanner output, it's already known that it will have to eval code in the block. So the overhead is only really the memory overhead in the scanner/parser to handle the #{} block, which you pay for either way.

Unless I'm missing something (or misremembering compiler construction details), which is also certainly possible :)

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~ > ruby -v   
jruby 1.6.7 (ruby-1.8.7-p357) (2012-02-22 3e82bc8) (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM 1.6.0_37) [darwin-x86_64-java]
~ > cat qu.rb 
require 'benchmark'

n = 1000000
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("assign single") { n.times do; c = 'a string'; end}
  x.report("assign double") { n.times do; c = "a string"; end}
  x.report("concat single") { n.times do; 'a string ' + 'b string'; end}
  x.report("concat double") { n.times do; "a string " + "b string"; end}
end
~ > ruby qu.rb
      user     system      total        real
assign single  0.186000   0.000000   0.186000 (  0.151000)
assign double  0.062000   0.000000   0.062000 (  0.062000)
concat single  0.156000   0.000000   0.156000 (  0.156000)
concat double  0.124000   0.000000   0.124000 (  0.124000)
share|improve this answer

There's one you all missed.

HERE doc

try this

require 'benchmark'
mark = <<EOS
a string
EOS
n = 1000000
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("assign here doc") {n.times do;  mark; end}
end

It gave me

`asign here doc  0.141000   0.000000   0.141000 (  0.140625)`

and

'concat single quotes  1.813000   0.000000   1.813000 (  1.843750)'
'concat double quotes  1.812000   0.000000   1.812000 (  1.828125)'

so it's certainly better than concat and writing all those puts.

I would like to see Ruby taught more along the lines of a document manipulation language.

After all, don't we really do that in Rails, Sinatra, and running tests?

share|improve this answer

I wanted to test double vs single quoted strings with escaped-tabs vs embedded tabs. I didn't think it'd make much difference, since, after parsing, the strings are the same in memory.

There are some minor differences, which I attribute to machine variations mostly:

require 'benchmark'

n = 10_000_000

Benchmark.bm(24) do |b|
  5.times do
    b.report('double-quotes with \t') { n.times { "\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t" } }
    b.report('double-quotes with ') { n.times { "                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              " } }
    b.report('single-quotes with ') { n.times { '                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              ' } }
  end
end

5.times do
  Benchmark.bm(24) do |b|
    b.report('double-quotes with \t') { n.times { "\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t\t" } }
    b.report('double-quotes with ') { n.times { "                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              " } }
    b.report('single-quotes with ') { n.times { '                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              ' } }
  end
end

In case the embedded tabs get munged by editors or browsers, I have a gist available with this code.

The results were inconclusive so I ran it five times, and that didn't answer my question, so I tried it again, looping outside the benchmark. It's interesting to see how times change, but in general I think it's worrying too much about something that won't make a lot of difference.

Five loops inside the Benchmark loop:

                              user     system      total        real
double-quotes with \t      1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.933657)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.930000   0.000000   1.930000 (  1.933460)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.900000   0.000000   1.900000 (  1.906409)
double-quotes with \t      1.900000   0.000000   1.900000 (  1.903380)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.940000   0.010000   1.950000 (  1.933855)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.900000   0.000000   1.900000 (  1.905163)
double-quotes with \t      1.900000   0.000000   1.900000 (  1.905092)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.940000   0.000000   1.940000 (  1.935304)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.900000   0.000000   1.900000 (  1.906644)
double-quotes with \t      1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.934921)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.940000   0.000000   1.940000 (  1.937238)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.900000   0.000000   1.900000 (  1.909966)
double-quotes with \t      1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.906580)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.940000   0.000000   1.940000 (  1.938278)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.010000   1.920000 (  1.938528)

Five loops around the Benchmark loop:

                              user     system      total        real
double-quotes with \t      1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.921710)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.914198)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.915610)
                              user     system      total        real
double-quotes with \t      1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.915321)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.912346)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.908014)
                              user     system      total        real
double-quotes with \t      1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.920199)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.910721)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.915402)
                              user     system      total        real
double-quotes with \t      1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.907217)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.010000   1.920000 (  1.907585)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.900000   0.000000   1.900000 (  1.908762)
                              user     system      total        real
double-quotes with \t      1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.909463)
double-quotes with <tab>   1.900000   0.000000   1.900000 (  1.908347)
single-quotes with <tab>   1.910000   0.000000   1.910000 (  1.907308)
share|improve this answer

I modded Tim Snowhite's answer.

require 'benchmark'
n = 1000000
attr_accessor = :a_str_single, :b_str_single, :a_str_double, :b_str_double
@a_str_single = 'a string'
@b_str_single = 'b string'
@a_str_double = "a string"
@b_str_double = "b string"
@did_print = false
def reset!
    @a_str_single = 'a string'
    @b_str_single = 'b string'
    @a_str_double = "a string"
    @b_str_double = "b string"
end
Benchmark.bm do |x|
    x.report('assign single       ') { n.times do; c = 'a string'; end}
    x.report('assign via << single') { c =''; n.times do; c << 'a string'; end}
    x.report('assign double       ') { n.times do; c = "a string"; end}
    x.report('assing interp       ') { n.times do; c = "a string #{'b string'}"; end}
    x.report('concat single       ') { n.times do; 'a string ' + 'b string'; end}
    x.report('concat double       ') { n.times do; "a string " + "b string"; end}
    x.report('concat single interp') { n.times do; "#{@a_str_single}#{@b_str_single}"; end}
    x.report('concat single <<    ') { n.times do; @a_str_single << @b_str_single; end}
    reset!
    # unless @did_print
    #   @did_print = true
    #   puts @a_str_single.length 
    #   puts " a_str_single: #{@a_str_single} , b_str_single: #{@b_str_single} !!"
    # end
    x.report('concat double interp') { n.times do; "#{@a_str_double}#{@b_str_double}"; end}
    x.report('concat double <<    ') { n.times do; @a_str_double << @b_str_double; end}
end

Results:

jruby 1.7.4 (1.9.3p392) 2013-05-16 2390d3b on Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM 1.7.0_10-b18 [darwin-x86_64]
       user     system      total        real
assign single         0.220000   0.010000   0.230000 (  0.108000)
assign via << single  0.280000   0.010000   0.290000 (  0.138000)
assign double         0.050000   0.000000   0.050000 (  0.047000)
assing interp         0.100000   0.010000   0.110000 (  0.056000)
concat single         0.230000   0.010000   0.240000 (  0.159000)
concat double         0.150000   0.010000   0.160000 (  0.101000)
concat single interp  0.170000   0.000000   0.170000 (  0.121000)
concat single <<      0.100000   0.000000   0.100000 (  0.076000)
concat double interp  0.160000   0.000000   0.160000 (  0.108000)
concat double <<      0.100000   0.000000   0.100000 (  0.074000)

ruby 1.9.3p429 (2013-05-15 revision 40747) [x86_64-darwin12.4.0]
       user     system      total        real
assign single         0.100000   0.000000   0.100000 (  0.103326)
assign via << single  0.160000   0.000000   0.160000 (  0.163442)
assign double         0.100000   0.000000   0.100000 (  0.102212)
assing interp         0.110000   0.000000   0.110000 (  0.104671)
concat single         0.240000   0.000000   0.240000 (  0.242592)
concat double         0.250000   0.000000   0.250000 (  0.244666)
concat single interp  0.180000   0.000000   0.180000 (  0.182263)
concat single <<      0.120000   0.000000   0.120000 (  0.126582)
concat double interp  0.180000   0.000000   0.180000 (  0.181035)
concat double <<      0.130000   0.010000   0.140000 (  0.128731)
share|improve this answer

I too thought that single quoted strings might be quicker to parse for ruby. It doesn't seem to be the case.

Anyway, I think the above benchmark are measuring the wrong thing, though. It stands to reason that either versions will be parsed into the same internal string representations so to get the answer as to which is quicker to parse, we shouldn't be measuring performance with string variables, but rather ruby's speed of parsing strings.

generate.rb: 
10000.times do
  ('a'..'z').to_a.each {|v| print "#{v}='This is a test string.'\n" }
end

#Generate sample ruby code with lots of strings to parse
$ ruby generate.rb > single_q.rb
#Get the double quote version
$ tr \' \" < single_q.rb > double_q.rb

#Compare execution times
$ time ruby single_q.rb 

real    0m0.978s
user    0m0.920s
sys     0m0.048s
$ time ruby double_q.rb 

real    0m0.994s
user    0m0.940s
sys     0m0.044s

Repeated runs don't seem to make much difference. It still takes pretty much the same time to parse either version of the string.

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