Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Lets start with three arrays of dtype=np.double. Timings are performed on a intel CPU using numpy 1.7.1 compiled with icc and linked to intel's mkl. A AMD cpu with numpy 1.6.1 compiled with gcc without mkl was also used to verify the timings. Please note the timings scale nearly linearly with system size and are not due to the small overhead incurred in the numpy functions if statements these difference will show up in microseconds not milliseconds:

arr_1D=np.arange(500,dtype=np.double)
large_arr_1D=np.arange(100000,dtype=np.double)
arr_2D=np.arange(500**2,dtype=np.double).reshape(500,500)
arr_3D=np.arange(500**3,dtype=np.double).reshape(500,500,500)

First lets look at the np.sum function:

np.all(np.sum(arr_3D)==np.einsum('ijk->',arr_3D))
True

%timeit np.sum(arr_3D)
10 loops, best of 3: 142 ms per loop

%timeit np.einsum('ijk->', arr_3D)
10 loops, best of 3: 70.2 ms per loop

Powers:

np.allclose(arr_3D*arr_3D*arr_3D,np.einsum('ijk,ijk,ijk->ijk',arr_3D,arr_3D,arr_3D))
True

%timeit arr_3D*arr_3D*arr_3D
1 loops, best of 3: 1.32 s per loop

%timeit np.einsum('ijk,ijk,ijk->ijk', arr_3D, arr_3D, arr_3D)
1 loops, best of 3: 694 ms per loop

Outer product:

np.all(np.outer(arr_1D,arr_1D)==np.einsum('i,k->ik',arr_1D,arr_1D))
True

%timeit np.outer(arr_1D, arr_1D)
1000 loops, best of 3: 411 us per loop

%timeit np.einsum('i,k->ik', arr_1D, arr_1D)
1000 loops, best of 3: 245 us per loop

All of the above are twice as fast with np.einsum. These should be apples to apples comparisons as everything is specifically of dtype=np.double. I would expect the speed up in an operation like this:

np.allclose(np.sum(arr_2D*arr_3D),np.einsum('ij,oij->',arr_2D,arr_3D))
True

%timeit np.sum(arr_2D*arr_3D)
1 loops, best of 3: 813 ms per loop

%timeit np.einsum('ij,oij->', arr_2D, arr_3D)
10 loops, best of 3: 85.1 ms per loop

Einsum seems to be at least twice as fast for np.inner, np.outer, np.kron, and np.sum regardless of axes selection. The primary exception being np.dot as it calls DGEMM from a BLAS library. So why is np.einsum faster that other numpy functions that are equivalent?

The DGEMM case for completeness:

np.allclose(np.dot(arr_2D,arr_2D),np.einsum('ij,jk',arr_2D,arr_2D))
True

%timeit np.einsum('ij,jk',arr_2D,arr_2D)
10 loops, best of 3: 56.1 ms per loop

%timeit np.dot(arr_2D,arr_2D)
100 loops, best of 3: 5.17 ms per loop

The leading theory is from @sebergs comment that np.einsum can make use of SSE2, but numpy's ufuncs will not until numpy 1.8 (see the change log). I believe this is the correct answer, but have not been able to confirm it. Some limited proof can be found by changing the dtype of input array and observing speed difference and the fact that not everyone observes the same trends in timings.

share|improve this question
    
What BLAS library is numpy linked against? Is it multithreaded? –  ali_m Aug 21 '13 at 19:16
    
Multithreaded MKL BLAS with AVX. –  Ophion Aug 21 '13 at 19:21
    
Incidentally, great question, and good examples! It might be worth asking this on the mailing list. It's been covered before (particularly with regards to sum), but I'm surprised that einsum is consistently ~2x faster than outer, inner, kron, etc. It would be interesting to know where the difference come from. –  Joe Kington Aug 21 '13 at 19:51
    
@JoeKington I think I will post it on the mailing list if someone else can reproduce the ~2x speedup. Strangely Jamie's answer does demonstrate this. –  Ophion Aug 21 '13 at 20:03
    
somewhat related: stackoverflow.com/questions/17527340/… but in that case, the reason for differences in speed seems to be memory management, (when you start making stuff really big at least) –  usethedeathstar Aug 22 '13 at 6:13

3 Answers 3

I think these timings explain what's going on:

a = np.arange(1000, dtype=np.double)
%timeit np.einsum('i->', a)
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.32 us per loop
%timeit np.sum(a)
100000 loops, best of 3: 6.84 us per loop

a = np.arange(10000, dtype=np.double)
%timeit np.einsum('i->', a)
100000 loops, best of 3: 12.6 us per loop
%timeit np.sum(a)
100000 loops, best of 3: 16.5 us per loop

a = np.arange(100000, dtype=np.double)
%timeit np.einsum('i->', a)
10000 loops, best of 3: 103 us per loop
%timeit np.sum(a)
10000 loops, best of 3: 109 us per loop

So you basically have an almost constant 3us overhead when calling np.sum over np.einsum, so they basically run as fast, but one takes a little longer to get going. Why could that be? My money is on the following:

a = np.arange(1000, dtype=object)
%timeit np.einsum('i->', a)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
TypeError: invalid data type for einsum
%timeit np.sum(a)
10000 loops, best of 3: 20.3 us per loop

Not sure what is going on exactly, but it seems that np.einsum is skipping some checks to extract type specific functions to do the multiplications and additions, and is going directly with * and + for standard C types only.


The multidimensional cases are not different:

n = 10; a = np.arange(n**3, dtype=np.double).reshape(n, n, n)
%timeit np.einsum('ijk->', a)
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.79 us per loop
%timeit np.sum(a)
100000 loops, best of 3: 7.33 us per loop

n = 100; a = np.arange(n**3, dtype=np.double).reshape(n, n, n)
%timeit np.einsum('ijk->', a)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.2 ms per loop
%timeit np.sum(a)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.23 ms per loop

So a mostly constant overhead, not a faster running once they get down to it.

share|improve this answer
1  
Also, the documentation suggests that einsum does not perform automatic broadcasting either, and relies on the user to express the broadcasting rules for an operation. So there are probably a lot of checks (type checking, broadcasting, etc.) that einsum is able to skip. –  Mr. F Aug 21 '13 at 19:10
    
Strangely they are different on my machine, please view my edit. –  Ophion Aug 21 '13 at 19:31
    
1 or more dimensions is basically the same thing. np.sum calls np.add.reduce, and that was redone for 1.7 to accept multiple axes. So the iteration is almost certainly being handled by a very similar call to the C equivalent of np.nditer in both cases. Unless you are avoiding intermediate arrays to do the multiply-then-add thing that numpy does, or you are using a multi-threaded library, you should see little differences apart from set up, which is what my timings kind of show. –  Jaime Aug 21 '13 at 19:44
7  
You should probably see a 2x speedup with double precision (SSE). Because sum is naive (might not be on 1.8+ not sure), while einsum is specifically written to use of SIMD instructions, most of the ufuncs do not. –  seberg Aug 21 '13 at 20:40
1  
@seberg You nailed it, both processors have SSE2 so one would expect single precision to be 4x as fast and it is. If you can write this up I will accept it. –  Ophion Aug 21 '13 at 21:04

First off, there's been a lot of past discussion about this on the numpy list. For example, see: http://numpy-discussion.10968.n7.nabble.com/poor-performance-of-sum-with-sub-machine-word-integer-types-td41.html http://numpy-discussion.10968.n7.nabble.com/odd-performance-of-sum-td3332.html

Some of boils down to the fact that einsum is new, and is presumably trying to be better about cache alignment and other memory access issues, while many of the older numpy functions focus on a easily portable implementation over a heavily optimized one. I'm just speculating, there, though.


However, some of what you're doing isn't quite an "apples-to-apples" comparison.

In addition to what @Jamie already said, sum uses a more appropriate accumulator for arrays

For example, sum is more careful about checking the type of the input and using an appropriate accumulator. For example, consider the following:

In [1]: x = 255 * np.ones(100, dtype=np.uint8)

In [2]: x
Out[2]:
array([255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
       255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
       255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
       255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
       255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
       255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
       255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255,
       255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255, 255], dtype=uint8)

Note that the sum is correct:

In [3]: x.sum()
Out[3]: 25500

While einsum will give the wrong result:

In [4]: np.einsum('i->', x)
Out[4]: 156

But if we use a less limited dtype, we'll still get the result you'd expect:

In [5]: y = 255 * np.ones(100)

In [6]: np.einsum('i->', y)
Out[6]: 25500.0
share|improve this answer
    
Do you have a good link for how sum picks the accumulator? Interestingly with your x array extend to 1E8 elements np.einsum('i->',x,dtype=np.uint64) is only about 10% faster (15ms) then sum. –  Ophion Aug 21 '13 at 20:01
    
@Ophion - The documentation for sum has some details. You can specify it with the dtype kwarg to sum. If it's not specified, and the array has an integer dtype with less precision than the "default platform integer" (usually int64 even on 32-bit platforms, I think), then it defaults to the default integer. See: docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.sum.html –  Joe Kington Aug 21 '13 at 20:19
    
Also, sum is implemented through np.add.reduce, so have a look at the source for reduction ufuncs here, if you're interested in the details: github.com/numpy/numpy/blob/master/numpy/core/src/umath/… –  Joe Kington Aug 21 '13 at 20:21
1  
If I understand it correctly, these are 'apples-to-apples' comparisons as everything is specifically confined to dtype=np.double? –  Ophion Aug 21 '13 at 20:30
2  
I think so. Which is what you were doing in the first place, after all. Therefore, the point I brought up probably isn't that relevant after all! –  Joe Kington Aug 21 '13 at 20:32
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Now that numpy 1.8 is released, where according to the docs all ufuncs should use SSE2, I wanted to double check that Seberg's comment about SSE2 was valid.

To perform the test a new python 2.7 install was created- numpy 1.7 and 1.8 were compiled with icc using standard options on a AMD opteron core running Ubuntu.

This is the test run both before and after the 1.8 upgrade:

import numpy as np
import timeit

arr_1D=np.arange(5000,dtype=np.double)
arr_2D=np.arange(500**2,dtype=np.double).reshape(500,500)
arr_3D=np.arange(500**3,dtype=np.double).reshape(500,500,500)

print 'Summation test:'
print timeit.timeit('np.sum(arr_3D)',
                      'import numpy as np; from __main__ import arr_1D, arr_2D, arr_3D',
                      number=5)/5
print timeit.timeit('np.einsum("ijk->", arr_3D)',
                      'import numpy as np; from __main__ import arr_1D, arr_2D, arr_3D',
                      number=5)/5
print '----------------------\n'


print 'Power test:'
print timeit.timeit('arr_3D*arr_3D*arr_3D',
                      'import numpy as np; from __main__ import arr_1D, arr_2D, arr_3D',
                      number=5)/5
print timeit.timeit('np.einsum("ijk,ijk,ijk->ijk", arr_3D, arr_3D, arr_3D)',
                      'import numpy as np; from __main__ import arr_1D, arr_2D, arr_3D',
                      number=5)/5
print '----------------------\n'


print 'Outer test:'
print timeit.timeit('np.outer(arr_1D, arr_1D)',
                      'import numpy as np; from __main__ import arr_1D, arr_2D, arr_3D',
                      number=5)/5
print timeit.timeit('np.einsum("i,k->ik", arr_1D, arr_1D)',
                      'import numpy as np; from __main__ import arr_1D, arr_2D, arr_3D',
                      number=5)/5
print '----------------------\n'


print 'Einsum test:'
print timeit.timeit('np.sum(arr_2D*arr_3D)',
                      'import numpy as np; from __main__ import arr_1D, arr_2D, arr_3D',
                      number=5)/5
print timeit.timeit('np.einsum("ij,oij->", arr_2D, arr_3D)',
                      'import numpy as np; from __main__ import arr_1D, arr_2D, arr_3D',
                      number=5)/5
print '----------------------\n'

Numpy 1.7.1:

Summation test:
0.172988510132
0.0934836149216
----------------------

Power test:
1.93524689674
0.839519000053
----------------------

Outer test:
0.130380821228
0.121401786804
----------------------

Einsum test:
0.979052495956
0.126066613197

Numpy 1.8:

Summation test:
0.116551589966
0.0920487880707
----------------------

Power test:
1.23683619499
0.815982818604
----------------------

Outer test:
0.131808176041
0.127472200394
----------------------

Einsum test:
0.781750011444
0.129271841049

I think this is fairly conclusive that SSE plays a large role in the timing differences, it should be noted that repeating these tests the timings very by only ~0.003s. The remaining difference should be covered in the other answers to this question.

share|improve this answer
2  
Fantastic followup! This is one more reason why I need to start using einsum more often. Incidentally, I'd argue you should really mark your own answer as correct, in this case. –  Joe Kington Oct 27 '13 at 17:36
    
Interesting; thanks for pointing that out! –  Eelco Hoogendoorn Dec 6 '13 at 8:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.