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Here is a sampling of the data I am working with:

id  group       class        phase   priority
----------------------------------------------
222 pc     aaaaaamarket      modify   1
222 pc     aaaaaamarket      modify   1
222 pc     aaaa2amarket      modify   1
222 pc     aaaaaamarket      modify   1
222 pc     aaaaaamarket      modify   1
222 pc     AAAAAbudgetlever  modify   4
222 pc     aaaabudgetlever   modify   7
222 pc     aaaabudgetlever   modify   7
222 pc     aaaabudgetlever   modify   7
222 pc     aaamatchtype      modify   13
222 pc     aa5matchtype      modify   13

What I would like to do is be able to tell if any rows that have the same priority, id, group, and phase but have different classes. However, I would like to examine the different groups of priorities separately.

So I would ideally get output like:

id  group       class        phase   priority
----------------------------------------------
222 pc     aaaa2amarket      modify   1
222 pc     aa5matchtype      modify   13

because these two rows have different classes, but everything else is the same.

Any thoughts on how I could accomplish this ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This will get you the list of suspect rows:

select id, group, phase, priority
from t
group by  id, group, phase, priority 
having min(class) <> max(class);

I'm not sure how you identify the two particular rows you've highlighted. It appears to be rows that are singleton differences when there are other rows in the group.

This will give you a list of the classes that are singleton classes when there are others with the four matching columns. If there is more than one such singleton for a group, then the class names become a comma delimited list:

select id, group, phase, priority, group_concat(class) as classes
from (select id, group, class, phase, priority, count(*) as cnt
      from t
      group by  id, group, class, phase, priority 
     ) t
where cnt = 1
group by id, group, phase, priority 
having min(class) <> max(class);
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You can use MySQL's GROUP BY, so:

SELECT * FROM table
GROUP BY class
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