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Say I have Class A and Class B. Class B extends Class A. Class A has one method.

public class notimportant
 {
    public void one()
    {
    }
 }

public class A extends notimportant
{
    public void one()
    { 
        //assume there is a super class making this call legal which doesnt do anything
        super.one();
        System.out.println("blah");
    } 
}

public class B extends A
{
}

A var1 = new B();

if I call 'var1.one();' will the output end up being:

"blah" "blah"

because it creates a local copy of 'one()' in Class B and then reads that which calls 'super()' which leads it up to method 'one()' in Class A OR does it just print

"blah"

because it knows to look directly at Class A

EDIT: Hope that is a lot more clear now.

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2  
The question would be better explained using actual code. Show us the structure you are having. Currently it's not very clear from your text. –  Rohit Jain Aug 21 '13 at 20:16
    
I goes all the way to the top class, then cascades down...not a very technical answer, it's better to see it on code. –  Fernando Aug 21 '13 at 20:16
1  
And what is that method before method name. There is no such modifier in Java. Also what is S.O.Pln? It takes mear 3 seconds to type System.out.println. –  Rohit Jain Aug 21 '13 at 20:17
    
It would print twice, however your code has a semantic error in that you're not allowed to have spaces in method names –  Jared Lindsey Aug 21 '13 at 20:18
1  
If the method is overwritten in the subclass, then only the subclass's method is called (unless inside it it has a call to super()). If the method is not overwritten in the subclass, then the superclass'es method is called. –  Evgheni Crujcov Aug 21 '13 at 20:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It will follow the way you have it currently written:

-> New object of class B

-> Call method One on this object

-> First line calls supermethod, proceed to execute it

-> Second line prints out after that

Your code doesn't compile at all though, you might want to clear that up. What's keeping you from testing this yourself?

Here's the new situation as you described it. Everything still works as expected, you just add a layer.

public class C {
    public void test() {
        System.out.println("Inside C");
    }
}

public class B extends C {
    public void test() {
        super.test();
        System.out.println("Inside B");
    }
}

public class A extends B {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A obj = new A();
        obj.test();
    }
}

Output:

Inside C
Inside B
share|improve this answer
    
I definitely could have tested it myself... for some reason thought there was some more conceptual under-the-hood of Java to the question. The code you typed up doesn't accurately represent my question though. Class A in this instance would not have a test() method but would simply inherit it from Class B, which would already have a call to super.test() in it. –  Milan Novaković Aug 21 '13 at 20:31
    
@MilanNovaković: I have edited my post. Does this reflect your situation more accurately? –  Jeroen Vannevel Aug 21 '13 at 20:42
    
Yes! Okay so conceptually speaking, there isn't a copy of an inherited method inside that subclass, it simply knows a reference and points to the super class? –  Milan Novaković Aug 21 '13 at 20:46
    
Indeed. If you don't specify an override of a method of a superclass it and you call that method on your object, then it will invoke the first (only) method in its hierarchy that corresponds to that signature. The sub-subclass has no knowledge that this method is also defined in a class two levels higher, so it will always refer to its own superclass . –  Jeroen Vannevel Aug 21 '13 at 20:49
    
A little clarification on the latter part... say there's a subclass to class A that doesn't override the method test(). If I call test() on that subclass then the same output from above would be produced right? –  Milan Novaković Aug 21 '13 at 20:55

super means your superclass – it's resolved at compile-time.

It does not mean the immediate parent class of whatever the runtime type of this is.

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