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I'm trying to create some kind of module or superclass that wraps one method call after each method of the subclass. There are some constraints though: I wouldn't want the method to be run after initialize() is called nor after a few other methods of my choice is called. Another constraint is that I would only want that method to be executed IF the flag @check_ec is set to true. I have classes with more than 60 methods that I have hard-coded the same piece of code that ispasted all over the place. Is there a way that I could make a wrapper that would automatically execute that method for my class methods?

So the idea is this:

class Abstract
  def initialize(check_ec)
    @check_ec = check_ec
  end
  def after(result) # this is the method that I'd like to be added to most methods
    puts "ERROR CODE: #{result[EC]}"
  end
  def methods(method) # below each method it would execute after
    result = method() # execute the given method normally
    after(result) if @check_ec and method != :initialize and method != :has_valid_params
  end
end

class MyClass < Abstract
  def initialize(name, some_stuff, check_error_code)
   # do some stuff...
    @name = name
    super(check_error_code)
  end
  def my_method_a() # execute after() after this method
    return {EC: 0}
  end   
  def my_method_b() # execute after() after this method
    return {EC: 7}
  end
  def has_valid_params() # don't execute after() on this method
    return true
  end

end
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is trivially easy using method_missing, and composition instead of inheritance. You can build a very simple class which forwards method invocations, and then executes an after callback, except for specific method names:

class Abstract
  def initialize(object)
    @object = object
  end

  def method_missing(method, *arguments)
    result = @object.send(method, *arguments)

    after() unless method == "has_valid_params"

    result
  end

  def after
    # whatever
  end
end

o = Abstract.new(MyClass.new)
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Columbus' egg! Simple and beautiful. :) –  jaeheung Aug 22 '13 at 3:19
    
this is awesome! solved my problem in an elegant way! –  Unglued Aug 22 '13 at 15:01
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A solution using singleton class.

class MyClass
  def initialize(name, some_stuff)
   # do some stuff...
    @name = name
  end
  def my_method_a # execute after() after this method
    return {EC: 0}
  end
  def my_method_b() # execute after() after this method
    return {EC: 7}
  end
  def has_valid_params() # don't execute after() on this method
    return true
  end
end

module ErrorCodeChecker
  def after(result) # this is the method that I'd like to be added to most methods
    puts "ERROR CODE: #{result[:EC]}"
  end

  def addErrorCodeCheck(exclude = [])
    methods = self.class.superclass.public_instance_methods(false) - exclude
    class << self
      self
    end.class_exec {
      methods.each {|method|
        define_method(method) {|*p|
          super(*p).tap {|res| after(res)}
        }
      }
    }
  end
end

class MyClassEC < MyClass
  include ErrorCodeChecker

  def initialize(name, some_stuff, check_error_code, exclude = [])
    super name, some_stuff
    addErrorCodeCheck(exclude) if check_error_code
  end
end

'addErrorCodeCheck' opens up the singleton class of an instance of MyClassEC, and redefines instance methods of MyClass not in the exclude list. The redefined methods hide the original methods but call them via 'super' method inside before calling 'after'.

You can apply 'addErrorCodeCheck' repeatedly later if needed.

Execution example: (tested in Ruby 1.9.3)

my = MyClassEC.new('test', 'abc', true, [:has_valid_params])

my.my_method_a    # => ERROR CODE: 0
my.my_method_b    # => ERROR CODE: 7
my.has_valid_params    # => (nothing)
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What about this? It has a major drawback which is that your methods must be already defined before calling check_error_code, but it may suit your needs. You could look for inspiration for a better solution in Rails callbacks, or defer the redefinition of each method until that method is added using the method_added hook.

Include ErrorCodeChecker and call check_error_code in each class you want to check the error code (as in the last line of the snippet).

module ErrorCodeChecker
  def self.included(base)
    base.send(:extend, ClassMethods)
  end

  def after(result) # this is the method that I'd like to be added to most methods
    puts "ERROR CODE: #{result[:ec]}"
  end

  module ClassMethods
    def check_error_code(options = {})
      check_on = instance_methods(false) - Array(options[:except])
      check_on &= Array(options[:only]) if options[:only]
      class_eval do
        check_on.each do |method|
          alias_method "#{ method }_without_ec", method
          define_method(method) do |*args, &block|
            send("#{ method }_without_ec", *args, &block).tap { |result| after(result) if @check_ec }

            #if you want to actually return the return value of calling after:
            #result = send("#{ method }_without_ec")
            #@check_ec ? after(result) : result
          end
        end
      end
    end
  end
 end

class Abstract
  include ErrorCodeChecker

  def initialize(check_ec)
    @check_ec = check_ec
  end
end

class MyClass < Abstract

  def initialize(name, some_stuff, check_error_code)
    # do some stuff...
    @name = name
    super(check_error_code)
  end
  def my_method_a # execute after() after this method
    {ec: 0}
  end   
  def my_method_b # execute after() after this method
    {ec: 7}
  end
  def has_valid_params # don't execute after() on this method
    true
  end

  check_error_code except: :has_valid_params
  #or whitelisting:
  #check_error_code only: [:my_method_a, :my_method_b]
  #or both:
  #check_error_code only: :my_method_a, except: [:has_valid_params, dont_check_this_one]
end 
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