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I have a directory (named "Top") that contains ten subdirectories (named "1", "2", ... "10"), and each of those subdirectories contains a large number of text files. I would like to be able to open all of the files in subdirectories 2-10 without opening the files in the subdirectory 1. (Then I will open files in subdirectories 1 and 3-10 without opening the files in the subdirectory 2, and so forth). Right now, I am attempting to read the files in subdirectories 2-10 without reading the files in subdirectory 1 by using the following code:

import os, fnmatch

def findfiles (path, filter):
    for root, dirs, files in os.walk(path):
        for file in fnmatch.filter(files, filter):
            yield os.path.join(root, file)

for textfile in findfiles(r'C:\\Top', '*.txt'):
    if textfile in findfiles(r'C:\\Top\\1', '*.txt'):
        pass   
    else:
        filename = os.path.basename(textfile)
        print filename

The trouble is, the if statement here ("if textfile in findfiles [...]") does not allow me to exclude the files in subdirectory 1 from the textfile list. Do any of you happen to know how I might modify my code so as to only print the filenames of those files in subdirectories 2-10? I would be most grateful for any advice you can lend on this question.

EDIT:

In case others might find it helpful, I wanted to post the code I ultimately ended up using to solve this problem:

import os, fnmatch, glob

for file in glob.glob('C:\\Text\\Digital Humanities\\Packages and Tools\\Stanford Packages\\training-the-ner-tagger\\fixed\*\*'):
    if not file.startswith('C:\\Text\\Digital Humanities\\Packages and Tools\\Stanford Packages\\training-the-ner-tagger\\fixed\\1\\'):
        print file
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change your loop to this:

for textfile in findfiles(r'C:\\Top', '*.txt'):
    if not textfile.startswith(r'C:\\Top\\1'):
        filename = os.path.basename(textfile)
        print filename
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your assistance, @Brent. For some reason, changing the loop still does not allow me to disregard the files in subdirectory 1. In case it's important, the directory "Top" is buried deep within my file system, so my path actually looks like: C:\\Directory\\Half a Dozen More Directories\\Top\\1 -- should that affect the startswith() method? – duhaime Aug 22 '13 at 0:31
    
Yes, you need to change the startswith() parameter then. It should be the exact string (prefix) that you want to exclude from your loop. – Brent Washburne Aug 22 '13 at 0:34
    
Thank you for your continued help. I changed the startswith() parameter to match the full path to subdirectory 1, but when I run the loop it still prints filenames that only appear in subdirectory 1. Am I missing something? – duhaime Aug 22 '13 at 0:38
    
Did you include the not in if not textfile.startswith(...)? – Brent Washburne Aug 22 '13 at 0:39
    
Yes. For some reason I'm still seeing filenames from subdirectory 1. I'm working in Python 2.7, Windows 8... – duhaime Aug 22 '13 at 0:42

The problem is as simple as that you are using extra \s in your constants. Write instead:

for textfile in findfiles(r'C:\Top', '*.txt'):
    if textfile in findfiles(r'C:\Top\1', '*.txt'):
        pass   
    else:
        filename = os.path.basename(textfile)
        print filename

The \\ would be correct if you hadn't used raw (r'') strings. If the performance of this code is too bad, try:

exclude= findfiles(r'C:\Top\1', '*.txt')
for textfile in findfiles(r'C:\Top', '*.txt'):
    if textfile in exclude:
        pass   
    else:
        filename = os.path.basename(textfile)
        print filename
share|improve this answer

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