Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have an assignment for my first OOP class, and I understand all of it including the following statement:

You should create a class called ComplexNumber. This class will contain the real and imaginary parts of the complex number in private data members defined as doubles. Your class should contain a constructor that allows the data members of the imaginary number to be specified as parameters of the constructor. A default (non-parameterized) constructor should initialize the data members to 0.0.

Of course I know how to create these constructors without chaining them together, and the assignment does not require chaining them, but I want to as I just like to.

Without chaining them together, my constructors look like this:

class ComplexNumber
{
    private double realPart;
    private double complexPart;

    public ComplexNumber()
    {
         realPart = 0.0;
         complexPart = 0.0
    }

    public ComplexNumber(double r, double c)
    {
         realPart = r;
         complexPart = c;
    }
    // the rest of my class code...
}
share|improve this question
3  
C# 4.0 made this task obsolete with System.Numerics.Complex =) – Rubens Farias Dec 3 '09 at 1:33
    
too bad I have to make my own! :) – Alex Dec 3 '09 at 1:34
1  
Ahhh, if only all of us could jump onto the latest and greatest version as soon as it comes out. I am still using .NET 2.0 and VS2005. :-) – Ed S. Dec 3 '09 at 1:36
    
Two side notes: 1) you don't need to initialize members to 0.0, since that is the default value for double members (and similarly 0 for int, null for reference types, etc); 2) you can use initializers: private double realPart = 0.0;. – Pavel Minaev Dec 3 '09 at 2:02
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Is this what you're looking for?

public ComplexNumber()
    : this(0.0, 0.0)
{
}

public ComplexNumber(double r, double c)
{
     realPart = r;
     complexPart = c;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, yes, initializes them both to 0.0, thanks! I am still trying to grasp the concept of constructor-chaining, so it works, but why/how? My professor has not touched constructor-chaining, nor will he, but I want to learn how to use it. – Alex Dec 3 '09 at 1:33
1  
@Alex it's pretty similar to calling other methods, except constructors don't have names - so instead of this.Method() we just call this(), or to call a constructor on a parent/superclass, base() – Rex M Dec 3 '09 at 1:37
    
Just like method chaining; you are calling constructor B from constructor A with the arguments required by B. – Ed S. Dec 3 '09 at 1:37
    
OK, appreciate the help, one more question, what if I want to construct my data members to 0 in my default constructor, but my paramed constructor takes some object(s), whereas my data members are ints, doubles, floats, etc.? – Alex Dec 3 '09 at 1:43
1  
@Alex: where would your non-default constructor take initial values for members, then? In any case... constructor chaining is a convenience construct. Use it when it makes sense, not all the time. – Pavel Minaev Dec 3 '09 at 2:01

@Rex has the connect answer for chaining.

However in this case chaining or any initialization is not necessary. The CLR will initialize fields to their default value during object constructor. For doubles this will cause them to be initialized to 0.0. So the assignment in the default constructor case is not strictly necessary.

Some people prefer to explicitly initialize their fields for documentation or readability though.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the explanation, but is it ever absolutely necessary to create a default constructor? (in c#) – Alex Dec 3 '09 at 1:37
    
For certain serialization processes, yes. – Mike Chess Dec 3 '09 at 1:50
    
One place where I have found the default constructor to be required was when doing databinding against certain objects (datagridview for example) – David Hall Dec 3 '09 at 1:54
1  
Your class is a typical "value class" (i.e. it represents some value, and its object identity by itself doesn't hold any semantic meaning. For such classes, it is reasonable to have a default/"zero" value, just as proper value types - int, bool, etc - do. So a default constructor makes sense for consistency reasons - just as I can write new int() and get 0, I should be able to write new ComplexNumber(), and get 0+0i. In general, however, not all classes need default constructors, and many specifically do not need one - when object requires some external data to initialize. – Pavel Minaev Dec 3 '09 at 2:06

I am still trying to grasp the concept of constructor-chaining, so it works, but why/how?

The 'how' of constructor chaining by using the 'this' keyword in the constructor definition, and shown in Rex M's example.

The 'why' of constructor chaining is to reuse the implementation of a constructor. If the implementation (body) of the 2nd constructor were long and complicated, then you'd want to reuse it (i.e. chain to it or invoke it) instead of copy-and-pasting it into other constructors. An alternative might be to put that code, which is shared between several constructors, into a common subroutine which is invoked from several constructors: however, this subroutine wouldn't be allowed to initialize readonly fields (which can only be initialized from a constructor and not from a subroutine), so constructor chaining is a work-around for that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.