Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In haskell, does s k v ~ s1 k1 v1, where s :: * -> * -> *, imply that k ~ k1, v ~ v1, or s ~ s1? If not, why doesn't it?

I encountered this when writing some experimental code, a small piece of which is:

newtype Article = Article String
newtype ArticleId = ArticleId Int
newtype Comment = Comment String
newtype CommentId = CommentId Int

data TableName k v where
    Articles :: TableName ArticleId Article
    Comments :: TableName CommentId Comment    

data CRUD k v r where
    Create :: v -> CRUD k v k
    Read :: k -> CRUD k v (Maybe v)

data Operation t r where
    Operation :: s k v -> CRUD k v r -> Operation (s k v) r        

operatesOn :: (Eq (s k v)) => s k v -> Operation (s k v) r -> Bool
operatesOn tableName1 (Operation tableName2 _) = tableName1 == tableName2 

Which doesn't compile due to the following error:

Could not deduce (v1 ~ v)
from the context (Eq (s k v))
  bound by the type signature for
             operatesOn :: Eq (s k v) => s k v -> Operation (s k v) r -> Bool
or from (s k v ~ s1 k1 v1)
  bound by a pattern with constructor
             Operation :: forall r (s :: * -> * -> *) k v.
                          s k v -> CRUD k v r -> Operation (s k v) r,
           in an equation for `operatesOn'
  `v1' is a rigid type variable bound by
       a pattern with constructor
         Operation :: forall r (s :: * -> * -> *) k v.
                      s k v -> CRUD k v r -> Operation (s k v) r,
       in an equation for `operatesOn'
       at src\Example\Error.hs:44:24
  `v' is a rigid type variable bound by
      the type signature for
        operatesOn :: Eq (s k v) => s k v -> Operation (s k v) r -> Bool
      at src\Example\Error.hs:43:15
Expected type: s k v
  Actual type: s1 k1 v1
In the second argument of `(==)', namely `tableName2'
In the expression: tableName1 == tableName2
In an equation for `operatesOn':
    operatesOn tableName1 (Operation tableName2 _)
      = tableName1 == tableName2
share|improve this question
    
The whole example is done, it was to answer this question: stackoverflow.com/a/18378077/414413. – Cirdec Aug 22 '13 at 15:32
    
Type application is injective, but that wasn't the problem. The deleted answer held helpful insight. – Cirdec Jan 16 '15 at 19:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I change the definition of Operation to

data Operation t r where
    Operation :: (t ~ s k v) => t -> CRUD k v r -> Operation t r

The operatesOn function will compile, similar to how it did for Maybe

The (t ~ s k v) => constraint(?) will still reject incorrect programs like:

doesntCompile = Operation Article $ Create $ Comment "Yo"

share|improve this answer
    
There was another answer, which answered the question that I asked directly, on which I discussed what happens with the Maybe data type. sameAsMaybe :: (Eq (s k v)) => s k v -> Maybe (s k v) -> Bool defined as sameAsMaybe a (Just b) = a == b compiles, which led me to this solution. – Cirdec Aug 22 '13 at 5:06
1  
constraint(?) - yes it's called equality constraint – nponeccop Aug 22 '13 at 13:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.