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I am using Visual Studio 2003 to compile and run following program.

There are 4 assignment operation where I expect 2 of them to run ok and 2 of them to raise exception. There is a dynamic casting inside overloaded = operator which expect to fail during non proper cross casting (Casting from Apple to Orange or Orange to Apple). But in my case all the 4 operations are failing ( Raising exception ). I have run the same code in Visual Studio 2008 and it is working fine as expected. But moving entire project to Visual Studio 2008 is difficult. Is this a problem of Visual Studio 2003? If so, is there any way to fix this?

Note: class Fruit is read only and cannot be changed.

class Fruit
{
public:
    virtual void operator = ( const Fruit& fruit )
    {
    }
};

class Apple : public Fruit
{
public:
    virtual void operator = ( const Fruit& fruit )
    {
    	Apple& apple = dynamic_cast<Apple&>( fruit );
    }
};

class Mango : public Fruit
{
public:
    virtual void operator = ( const Fruit& fruit )
    {
    	Mango& mango = dynamic_cast<Mango&>( fruit );
    }
};

int main( void )
{
    Apple apple;
    Mango mango;
    Fruit* fruit[] = { &apple, &mango };

    *fruit[0] = *fruit[0]; /* Expect to work ok */
    *fruit[0] = *fruit[1]; /* Expect an exception */
    *fruit[1] = *fruit[0]; /* Expect an exception */
    *fruit[1] = *fruit[1]; /* Expect to work ok */
}
share|improve this question
1  
Are you sure you enabled RTTI in your VS 2003 project settings? –  AndreyT Dec 3 '09 at 2:59
1  
Besides your question, you should always declare the parameter of assignment operator to const&. Even if it works without const, a user would not expect a side effect on the right hand of the assigment it writes (e.g. your *fruit[0] = *fruit[1] could alter the object at *fruit[1] in any way): virtual void operator = ( const Fruit& fruit ) {..} Only cases where non-const makes sense are usually some kind of "move" semantics.. –  Frunsi Dec 3 '09 at 3:42
    
@frunsi - Thanks for the tip ;) –  Vadakkumpadath Dec 3 '09 at 15:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to check Enable Run-time type information (RTTI) in Project Settings. Category "C++ Language".

In VC6 at least it will not be enabled by default.

share|improve this answer
    
If the parent class was compiled to a library without RTTI turned on, and you can't recompile it, you may be out of luck. –  Mark Ransom Dec 3 '09 at 3:16
    
It works man... Thanks a lot aJ.......... :) –  Vadakkumpadath Dec 3 '09 at 3:33

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