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I'm learning how to use Boost.Spirit library for parsing strings. It seems to be a very nice tool but difficult as well. So, I want to parse a string with some words separated with / and put them in a vector of strings. Here is an example:word1/word2/word3. That's a simple task, I can do this with the following finction:

bool r = phrase_parse(first, last, (+~char_("/") % qi::lit("/")),space,v)

where v is std::vector<std::string>. But in general, I'd like to parse something like w1/[w2/w3]2/w4 which is equivalent to w1/w2/w3/w2/w3/w4, that is [w2/w3]2 means that w2/w3 is repeated twice. Could anyone give me some ideas on that? I read the documentation but still have some problems.

Thank you in advance!

share|improve this question
    
You should first write down an ebnf syntax of the format you want to parse. –  PlasmaHH Aug 22 '13 at 10:18
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. The title you chose for this question is a little vague. The entire purpose of Boost.Spirit is to parse strings. Do you think you could edit it so that it's something more specific to your issue, instead of being equally applicable to every Spirit question ever? –  Rob Kennedy Aug 22 '13 at 21:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Fully working demo: live on Coliru

What this adds over a naive approach is that raw values are optionally ended at ] if the state is in_group.

I elected pass the state using an inherited attribute (bool).

This implementation allows nested sub-groups as well, e.g.: "[w1/[w2/w3]2/w4]3"

#define BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix.hpp>

namespace phx = boost::phoenix;

int main()
{
    typedef std::string::const_iterator It;
    const std::string input = "[w1/[w2/w3]2/w4]3";

    std::vector<std::string> v;
    It first(input.begin()), last(input.end());

    using namespace boost::spirit::qi;

    rule<It, std::string(bool in_group)> raw;
    rule<It, std::vector<std::string>(bool in_group), space_type> 
        group, 
        delimited;

    _r1_type in_group; // friendly alias for the inherited attribute

    raw       = eps(in_group) >> +~char_("/]") 
              | +~char_("/");

    delimited = (group(in_group)|raw(in_group)) % '/';

    group     = ('[' >> delimited(in_group=true) >> ']' >> int_) 
        [ phx::while_(_2--) 
            [ phx::insert(_val, phx::end(_val), phx::begin(_1), phx::end(_1)) ]
        ];

    BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODES((raw)(delimited)(group));

    bool r = phrase_parse(first, last, 
            delimited(false),
            space,v);

    if (r)
        std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));
}

Prints:

w1
w2
w3
w2
w3
w4
w1
w2
w3
w2
w3
w4
w1
w2
w3
w2
w3
w4

(besides debug info)

share|improve this answer
    
Made this a bit more readable by aliasing _r1 to in_group –  sehe Aug 22 '13 at 22:23
    
Removed c++11 bits because they were irrelevant to the answer and didn't really simplify much –  sehe Aug 23 '13 at 12:02

This is my quick implementation ( c++11 ). You can find a lot of scenarios how to tackle various problems in boost-spirit-qi and I agree learning SPIRIT takes some effort :-)

#define BOOST_RESULT_OF_USE_DECLTYPE
#define BOOST_SPIRIT_USE_PHOENIX_V3
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>

struct SInsert
{
    struct result
    {
        typedef void type;
    };

    void operator()( std::vector<std::string>&out, 
                     std::vector<std::string>&in, int counter ) const
    {
        for( int i=0; i<counter; ++i )
            std::copy( in.begin(), in.end(), std::back_inserter(out) );
    }
};

boost::phoenix::function<SInsert> inserter;

int main()
{
    namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;
    namespace ph = boost::phoenix;
    namespace ascii = boost::spirit::ascii;

    for ( auto &str : std::vector< std::string >
        {   "w1/ w2 /w4 ",
            "[w2]1 /w4 ",
            "[w2/w3]2 /w4 ",
            "[]0",
            "[]0 / w4"
        }
    )
    {
        std::cout << "input:" << str << std::endl;
        std::string::const_iterator iter( str.begin() );
        std::string::const_iterator last( str.end() );
        std::vector< std::string > v;

        qi::rule<std::string::const_iterator,
            qi::locals< std::vector<std::string>  >,
            ascii::space_type ,std::vector<std::string>()> mrule =
                ( qi::as_string[ qi::lexeme[ +(qi::graph -"/"-"[") ] ][ ph::push_back( qi::_val,qi::_1 )] |
                    (
                        qi::lit("[")
                            >> -(
                                    qi::eps[ ph::clear( qi::_a ) ]
                                    >> qi::as_string[ qi::lexeme[ +(qi::graph-"/"-"]") ] ][  ph::push_back( qi::_a ,qi::_1 ) ]
                                    % qi::lit("/")
                                )
                    )
                    >> qi::lit("]" )
                    >> qi::int_[ inserter( qi::_val,qi::_a,qi::_1 ) ]
                )
                % qi::lit("/");

        if( qi::phrase_parse( iter, last, mrule , ascii::space, v ) && iter==last )
            std::copy( v.begin(), v.end(), 
                       std::ostream_iterator<std::string>( std::cout,"\n" ));
        else
           std::cerr << "parsing failed:" << *iter << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

You can further simplify the mrule so that the attributes are synthesized automatically rather than using semantic actions - even though you wont avoid them altogether:

qi::rule<std::string::const_iterator,
    qi::locals< std::vector<std::string>  >,
    ascii::space_type ,std::vector<std::string>()> mrule;
    mrule %=
        (
            qi::as_string[ qi::lexeme[ +(qi::graph -"/"-"[") ] ] |                      
                qi::lit("[")
                    >> -(
                            qi::eps[ ph::clear( qi::_a ) ]
                            >> qi::as_string[ qi::lexeme[ +(qi::graph-"/"-"]") ] ][ ph::push_back( qi::_a ,qi::_1 ) ]
                            % qi::lit("/")
                        )
            >> qi::lit("]" )
            >> qi::omit[ qi::int_[ inserter( qi::_val,qi::_a,qi::_1-1 ) ] ]
        )
        % qi::lit("/");

As sehe pointed to some ugly constructs, here is minor simplification:

qi::rule<std::string::const_iterator,
    qi::locals< std::vector<std::string>  >,
    ascii::space_type ,std::vector<std::string>()> mrule;
mrule %= (
            qi::as_string[ qi::lexeme[ +qi::alnum ] ] |
            qi::lit("[")
               >> -(
                   qi::eps[ ph::clear( qi::_a ) ] >>
                   qi::as_string[ qi::lexeme[ +qi::alnum ] ][ ph::push_back( qi::_a ,qi::_1 ) ]
                   % qi::lit("/")
                   )
                   >> qi::lit("]")
                   >> qi::omit[ qi::int_[ inserter( qi::_val,qi::_a,qi::_1-1 ) ] ]
            ) % qi::lit("/");
share|improve this answer
    
Hehe. I kinda chuckled at 'You can further simplify'. +1 for effort though. I'm trying to decide which version I like better, yours or mine :) –  sehe Aug 22 '13 at 22:12
    
@sehe I think my version is easier for beginners :-) –  G. Civardi Aug 22 '13 at 22:13
    
Sadly, I cannot agree. I have just inspected it more closely. The use of qi::locals, many semantic actions and 'spurious' parser hints (like -'[') make it hard. Also, the christmas tree code layout makes it harder. –  sehe Aug 22 '13 at 22:21
    
Also, note that your version will simply fail to parse "w1/[w2/[w3]3]2/w4" without warning –  sehe Aug 22 '13 at 22:22
    
@sehe Are you sure? –  G. Civardi Aug 22 '13 at 22:28

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