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Begin Try
Declare @SQL NVarchar(Max)='Exec [MyLinkedServer].master.dbo.sp_executesql N''Drop Table [tempdb].dbo.[T1]''';
Print   @SQL;
Exec master.dbo.sp_executesql @SQL;
End Try
Begin Catch
Print Error_Message()
End Catch

The above script fails when the table T1 doesn't exist in MyLinkedServer instead of being directed to Catch section. What do I miss?

Just to be clear: the original procedure constructs the @SQL dynamicaly inside a procedure using parameters.

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

No, the above script does not fail and works exactly as you expect it:

Begin Try
Declare @SQL NVarchar(Max)='Exec [MyLinkedServer].master.dbo.sp_executesql N''Drop Table [tempdb].dbo.[T1]''';
Print   @SQL;
Exec master.dbo.sp_executesql @SQL;
End Try
Begin Catch
print 'in catch'
Print Error_Message()
End Catch

Exec [MyLinkedServer].master.dbo.sp_executesql N'Drop Table [tempdb].dbo.[T1]'
in catch
Could not find server 'MyLinkedServer' in sys.servers. Verify that the correct server name was specified. If necessary, execute the stored procedure sp_addlinkedserver to add the server to sys.servers.

See that 'in catch' message? Is proof that the catch block was executed.

But you are right that there is a well known issue in that compilation errors cannot be caught in the scope they occur. Which is absolutely to be expected, is like asking a catch block in a C# program to run when the code fails to compile... The issue is well explained in great detailed at Error Handling in SQL 2005 and Later. You have to create an outer scope to catch the compilation error that occurs in the inner scope. Which is exactly what you do in your posted example!

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Thank you, but you have a different error: you don't have a linked server whose name is MyLinkedServer, and such a local error is handled by the Try & Catch. –  Geri Reshef Aug 22 '13 at 10:45
    
Is you XACT_ABORT ON or OFF? See Handling Errors in Server-to-Server Remote Stored Procedures. –  Remus Rusanu Aug 22 '13 at 11:00
    
I Tried both options and the results are just the same. –  Geri Reshef Aug 22 '13 at 11:19
    
I Tried both options and the results are just the same. What is seemed very strange is that the same code with 'create table [tempdb].dbo.[T1](I Int)' when it already exists (severity 11) works fine, but with 'Drop table [tempdb].dbo.[T1]' (severity 16) fails. Thank you very much for your help. –  Geri Reshef Aug 22 '13 at 11:25

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