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Hello I am trying to display the constraints in one of my tables but for some reason I get the message no rows selected. Noted below is the table I have created.

Create table Teams (
   TeamID varCHAR2(4) constraint Teams_TeamID_PK Primary Key,
   TeamName VARCHAR2(40) 
);

This is the code I am using to show my constraints.

SELECT constraint_name, 
       constraint_type,
       search_condition
  FROM USER_CONSTRAINTS
 WHERE table_name = 'Teams';

I am a rookie so I want to make sure I understand what is wrong. I have tried to drop the table thinking that my constraints did not take - I did not, nor did I receive any errors when I created the table and I am referencing TeamID in another table. So when I try to drop the table I get an error message when is what I was hoping for.

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Your issue strikes me as that you are performing this actions as different users and/or aren't committing the transaction when you create the table. –  OMG Ponies Dec 3 '09 at 5:56
    
CREATE TABLE is DDL that autocommits upon execution in Oracle. –  DCookie Dec 3 '09 at 6:05
    
You can't drop a table that is referenced by other tables, unless you specify "CASCADE CONSTRAINTS", i.e. "DROP TABLE Teams CASCADE CONSTRAINTS" –  ammoQ Dec 3 '09 at 9:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

select dbms_mview.get_ddl('TABLE',USER,'TEAMS') from dual;

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Try this:

SELECT constraint_name, 
       constraint_type,
       search_condition
  FROM USER_CONSTRAINTS
 WHERE table_name = 'TEAMS';

Unless double-quoted when created, all object names in Oracle are upper case.

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Works! amazing... –  Eran Medan Aug 20 '11 at 3:03

If you prefer the CamelCase names, your create table script should have been:

Create table "Teams" ( 
  "TeamID" varCHAR2(4) constraint "Teams_TeamID_PK" Primary Key, 
  "TeamName" VARCHAR2(40)  
);

Without double-quotes Oracle helpfully converts all identifiers to uppercase :)

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Use the following code:

show create table table_name;

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Will work in MySQL but not in MS SQL Server and Oracle. –  Anand Murali Mar 21 at 4:28

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