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I have some legacy application logic that sends files to an attached printer using a DOS copy command:

copy fileToPrint \myLocalComputerName\printerShareName

The problem is that even though the application is running on the computer that's physically attached to the printer since it's using a network "share" it requires the network be available. If the network isn't available DOS throws a network unavailable error.

How can I code this so I don't have the network dependency? (preferably without re-architecting the entire file based print logic)

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Found the following article which uses a loopback network adapter to access the local share when the network is unavailable.

http://geekswithblogs.net/dtotzke/articles/26204.aspx

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+1. Very good. This is worth knowing. – David Dec 3 '09 at 16:10

Does this work? (Old DOS trick)

type myfile.txt > prn

This should work if the printer in question is the default printer on the PC.

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It's not the default printer. :-( – Jeff Dec 3 '09 at 5:58
    
OK. Sorry I don't have a better answer. – David Dec 3 '09 at 5:59
    
But, it looks like the same trick might work with LPT1. I'll check in the morning. Thanks for the idea. – Jeff Dec 3 '09 at 6:04
    
That didn't work directly, but I found that the print command did--for LPT1. However, that didn't work with my newer USB printer. However, found a solution (will post as separate answer.) Thanks for the this idea however--upvote! – Jeff Dec 3 '09 at 15:10

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