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I'm trying to get the mode of a certain list of variables. When the mode is not unique, I want to return the average of the mode so that a subquery to get the mode (in a larger query) doesn't return two values. However, when the mode is unique, the average query returns a missing value for some reason.

I have the following sample data:

data have;
input betprice;
datalines; 
    1.05
    1.05
    1.05
    6
    run;
    PROC PRINT; RUN;

proc sql;
select avg(betprice) 
    from
    (select betprice, count(*) as count_betprice from have group by betprice) 
    having count_betprice = max(count_betprice);
quit;

If I add a few more observations to the betprice field so that the mode is not unique, I DO get returned the average value.

data have;
input betprice;
datalines; 
    1.05
    1.05
    1.05
    6
    6
    6

run;
PROC PRINT; RUN;

How can I change this query so that I'm always returned either the mode or the average of the two most frequent values.

Thanks for any help on this.

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you want the average of the modes? From a statistical standpoint, that's not an interesting term at all. The only reason MODE is really useful is in seeing a distribution. Having MODE=4 if you are taking the mean doesn't tell you if it's a binomial distribution with a single mode of 4, or a plateau with 3 and 4 and 5 all equal, or a really skewed one with 1 and 7. –  Joe Aug 22 '13 at 14:02
    
I think it's interesting! I want to classify players according to their choice of betprice over their first 10 or 20 bets. Betprice is not a continuous variable and only has four discrete values: 6, 2, 1.83 and 1.05. How do I rank players according to their first 10 bets? If I take the average, it's not great, as the value 6 is too far away from the value 1.05. If a player has 7 bets at 1.05 and three bets at 6, I'd say he is should be ranked as a 1.05 player. If I take the average, it's almost 3: a higher average than someone who have 10 bets at a price of 2. –  user2146441 Aug 22 '13 at 14:13
1  
I don't think the mean of the mode itself is interesting, though. If it's a tie, then what you do with it depends on your analysis, but I don't understand how the mean is useful? Since you have four discrete values I suppose it's obvious that their "mean of modes" is a mean/mode of a particular pair, but is someone who bets 1.05 and 6 equally frequently similar to someone who bets 3.55 frequently (were that possible)? Doesn't seem like it to me. –  Joe Aug 22 '13 at 14:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This was pretty hard, after 12 years working with SAS, I can't remember I've been/seen using HAVING without GROUP BY, I guess it produces unexpected results.

So for a single query my solution is not very nice since it does the grouping twice.

A single query version:

proc sql;
select avg(betprice) 
    from ( select
                  betprice
                , count(*) as count_betprice
                from work.have
                group by betprice) /* first summary */
    where count_betprice
                = select max(count_betprice)
        from
          (select
                  betprice
                , count(*) as count_betprice
                from work.have
                group by betprice) /* same summary here */;
quit;

A bit of simplification using an intermediate table (or view if you need) instead of same subquery:

proc sql;
create table work.freq_sum
        as select
                betprice
                , count(*) as count_betprice
                from work.have
                group by betprice
;
select avg(betprice) 
    from work.freq_sum
    where count_betprice
                = select max(count_betprice) from work.freq_sum;
quit;

Pls, note you can calculate statistics like MODE and MEDIAN by PROC MEANS:

proc means data=have n mean mode median;
var betprice;
run;
share|improve this answer
    
Each row in the full 'have' table has a timestamp, a username, a betprice and some other columns. There are multiple entries for each username. The larger query will extract each username and the players average betprice on the 1st - 20th bets along with some other summmary stats. The first single query version you suggest works fine for this! –  user2146441 Aug 22 '13 at 13:32
1  
PROC UNIVARIATE is better for mode, because it will return multiple modes. I also suggest NOT using the single query version (As vasja seems to as well), not because there's anything wrong with it, but it's just easier to read and maintain the second (in particular if you make the first part a view). Writing big complicated queries is not a sign of good coding practice, unless you are trying for 'job security'. –  Joe Aug 22 '13 at 14:03
    
Since I'm working from a table of bets with a player name, betprice, bet amount etc on each row, and then creating an aggregate table with a unique row for each player, I don't immediately see the value in splitting this up into a series of views, intermediate datasteps and temporary tables. It seems more parsimonious just to use 'subselects' to populate the column data for each player row. Maybe I'm on the wrong track on this. . –  user2146441 Aug 22 '13 at 14:18
1  
It's just that it makes it easier to read and/or maintain the code if it's split up into two pieces, one a view (or a temporary table) which means it doesn't impact performance. One massive query that's a hundred lines long or whatever is harder to debug, maintain, read than several queries, even if you move things into temporary tables at a slight performance hit. In fact, sometimes that improves performance because the SQL optimizer can make better decisions on smaller queries (in particular because the qualities of the data matter). –  Joe Aug 22 '13 at 17:59

You're in SAS, why not let SAS calculate the statistic, since that's sort of what it's good at...

ods output modes=want;
proc univariate data=have modes;
var betprice;
run;
ods output close;

proc means data=want;
var mode;
output out=final(keep=betprice) mean=betprice;
run;

This won't take terribly long, is much clearer to another programmer what you're doing, and is very easy to code. If you weren't taking the mean of the modes, you could do it in one step.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, didn't know UNIVARIATE can produce more than one MODE. Compare to MEANS that selects the smaller one?! –  vasja Aug 22 '13 at 14:26
1  
Univariate and Means both by default select the smallest one. Univariate also can produce multiple this way, if you ask it to (the modes option in the PROC UNIVARIATE statement), but it has to be output with ODS OUTPUT, not the output statement. –  Joe Aug 22 '13 at 14:58

First, note that you do not have a group by statement on the outer query, while you do use a having clause. Which is not ok.

Here is a solution that works:

proc sql;
    create view WORK.V_BETPRICE_FREQ as
    select betprice, count(*) as count_betprice
    from HAVE
    group by betprice
    ;

    select avg(betprice) as final_betprice
    from WORK.V_BETPRICE_FREQ
    where count_betprice = (select max(count_betprice) from WORK.V_BETPRICE_FREQ)
    ;
quit;

I used a view here to prevent code-duplication. If the query in the view is a really heavy operation CPU-wise, you may want to replace it with a physical table instead.

EDIT As feedback: i believe you struggled with the query because at the outer query you wanted:
1. Perform an aggregate function across all the records after filtering.
2. Use an aggregate function in your filter.
You cannot do the first with a group by statement present while you cannot do the second without a group by statement present.

So in the end result, i kept the first in the outer query while performing the second in an additional subquery.

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