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Is it possible to implement mouse click and drag selection box in WPF. Should it be done through simply drawing a rectangle, calculating coordinates of its points and evaluating position of other objects inside this box? Or are there some other ways?

Could you give a bit of sample code or a link?

share|improve this question
    
For drawing specifically, it's not so simple, since you'll probably want your selection box to be drawn on top of everything, and your objects are likely UIElements themselves. You'll need to use an adorner. –  Pavel Minaev Dec 3 '09 at 17:31
    
Pavel, thank you for your tip. I will dig into the adorner topic. If you could give me yet another bit of info (just study direction) on using adorner for this purpose I would be greatful. In anyway, thank you. –  rem Dec 3 '09 at 19:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Here is sample code for a simple technique that I have used in the past to draw a drag selection box.

XAML:

<Window x:Class="DragSelectionBox.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300"
    >
    <Grid
        x:Name="theGrid"
        MouseDown="Grid_MouseDown"
        MouseUp="Grid_MouseUp"
        MouseMove="Grid_MouseMove"
        Background="Transparent"
        >
        <Canvas>
            <!-- This canvas contains elements that are to be selected -->
        </Canvas>

        <Canvas>
            <!-- This canvas is overlaid over the previous canvas and is used to 
                place the rectangle that implements the drag selection box. -->
            <Rectangle
                x:Name="selectionBox"
                Visibility="Collapsed"
                Stroke="Black"
                StrokeThickness="1"
                />
        </Canvas>
    </Grid>
</Window>

C#:

public partial class Window1 : Window
{
    public Window1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    bool mouseDown = false; // Set to 'true' when mouse is held down.
    Point mouseDownPos; // The point where the mouse button was clicked down.

    private void Grid_MouseDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
    {
        // Capture and track the mouse.
        mouseDown = true;
        mouseDownPos = e.GetPosition(theGrid);
        theGrid.CaptureMouse();

        // Initial placement of the drag selection box.         
        Canvas.SetLeft(selectionBox, mouseDownPos.X);
        Canvas.SetTop(selectionBox, mouseDownPos.Y);
        selectionBox.Width = 0;
        selectionBox.Height = 0;

        // Make the drag selection box visible.
        selectionBox.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
    }

    private void Grid_MouseUp(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
    {
        // Release the mouse capture and stop tracking it.
        mouseDown = false;
        theGrid.ReleaseMouseCapture();

        // Hide the drag selection box.
        selectionBox.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;

        Point mouseUpPos = e.GetPosition(theGrid);

        // TODO: 
        //
        // The mouse has been released, check to see if any of the items 
        // in the other canvas are contained within mouseDownPos and 
        // mouseUpPos, for any that are, select them!
        //
    }

    private void Grid_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        if (mouseDown)
        {
            // When the mouse is held down, reposition the drag selection box.

            Point mousePos = e.GetPosition(theGrid);

            if (mouseDownPos.X < mousePos.X)
            {
                Canvas.SetLeft(selectionBox, mouseDownPos.X);
                selectionBox.Width = mousePos.X - mouseDownPos.X;
            }
            else
            {
                Canvas.SetLeft(selectionBox, mousePos.X);
                selectionBox.Width = mouseDownPos.X - mousePos.X;
            }

            if (mouseDownPos.Y < mousePos.Y)
            {
                Canvas.SetTop(selectionBox, mouseDownPos.Y);
                selectionBox.Height = mousePos.Y - mouseDownPos.Y;
            }
            else
            {
                Canvas.SetTop(selectionBox, mousePos.Y);
                selectionBox.Height = mouseDownPos.Y - mousePos.Y;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Work very well, thanks! –  Laurent Bourgault-Roy May 1 '11 at 20:39
2  
Genius! Add a StrokeDashArray="2,1" to your rectangle to get a dotted line selector. –  Carter Mar 22 '12 at 18:27
    
Great solution. One improvement I did is to add following code after Point mousePos = e.GetPosition(theGrid); in Grid_MouseMove() to constraint selection rectangle to the parent Grid: if (mousePos.X < 0) mousePos.X = 0; if (mousePos.X > theGrid.ActualWidth) mousePos.X = theGrid.ActualWidth; if (mousePos.Y < 0) mousePos.Y = 0; if (mousePos.Y > theGrid.ActualHeight) mousePos.Y = theGrid.ActualHeight; –  matori82 Jul 8 '12 at 13:20

I have just written a code project article on how to implement drag selection and multiple item dragging in WPF:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/WPF/SimpleDragSelection.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Great article, just what I needed. –  Paulie Waulie Feb 17 '12 at 17:30
    
I just thought I would share that I made a small change for my purposes with regards to the selection tolerance. Instead of inflating the rectangle and then creating new rectangles to see which would fit, I added a centre point property to my item model and then checked if the drag rectangle contained that point. Worked for me, hope it help someone else too. –  Paulie Waulie Feb 20 '12 at 9:43

You can get this functionality pretty easily by adding an InkCanvas and set its EditingMode to Select. Although it's primarily intended for Tablet PC ink collection and rendering, it's very easy to use it as a basic designer surface.

<Window Width="640" Height="480" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation">
    <InkCanvas EditingMode="Select">
    	<Button Content="Button" Width="75" Height="25"/>
    	<Button Content="Button" Width="75" Height="25"/>
    </InkCanvas>
</Window>
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Josh, Thank you. I will certainly study the InkCanvas functionality. Just tell me please, do you mean that drawing a rectangle on InkCanvas will match automatically all objects beneath it and will allow to turn them selected? –  rem Dec 3 '09 at 18:33
    
Unfortunately I can't seem to find an easy way to get InkCanvas to use a rectangular selection. It uses a lasso selection. But yes, you put elements in it and you can select them with a lasso and drag, resize, etc. You can disable the drag/resize functionality by setting properties on the InkCanvas. –  Josh Dec 3 '09 at 19:33
1  
I put your code in a test WPF project and played with it for a while. And yes, it appeared to have a lot of interesting features including what you said - a lasso, drag, resize. I didn't know about it. Thank you. But, you know, I didn't expect that it would be so hard to find information about selection box. To be honest, I expected it to be among standard predefined functionality, say, like putting button on the canvas.. :) –  rem Dec 3 '09 at 19:49
    
The InkCanvas is described in the book "Pro WPF in C# 2010" by M. MacDonald, p. 96. FYI. –  Sabuncu Mar 31 '12 at 19:04

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