Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I am using the pandas/python and have a dataframe along the following lines:

21627   red
21627   green
21627   red
21627   blue
21627   purple
21628   yellow
21628   red
21628   green
21629   red
21629   red

Which I want to reduce to:

21627   red, green, blue, purple
21628   yellow, red, green
21629   red

Whats the best way of doing this (and collapsing all values in lists to unique values)?

Also, if I wanted to keep the redundancy:

21627   red, green, red, blue, purple
21628   yellow, red, green
21629   red, red

Whats the best way of achieving this?

Thanks in advance for any help.

share|improve this question
    
answer here and tutorial here –  georgesl Aug 22 '13 at 13:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you really wanted to do this you could use a groupby apply:

In [11]: df.groupby('id').apply(lambda x: list(set(x['colours'])))
Out[11]: 
id
21627    [blue, purple, green, red]
21628          [green, red, yellow]
21629                         [red]
dtype: object

In [12]: df.groupby('id').apply(lambda x: list(x['colours']))
Out[12]: 
id
21627    [red, green, red, blue, purple]
21628               [yellow, red, green]
21629                         [red, red]
dtype: object

However, DataFrames containing lists are not particularly efficient.

Pivot table gets you a more useful DataFrame:

In [21]: df.pivot_table(rows='id', cols='colours', aggfunc=len, fill_value=0)
Out[21]: 
colours  blue  green  purple  red  yellow
id                                       
21627       1      1       1    2       0
21628       0      1       0    1       1
21629       0      0       0    2       0

My favourite function get_dummies lets you do it but not as elegantly or efficiently (but I'll keep this original, if crazy, suggestion):

In [22]: pd.get_dummies(df.set_index('id')['colours']).reset_index().groupby('id').sum()
Out[22]: 
       blue  green  purple  red  yellow
id                                     
21627     1      1       1    2       0
21628     0      1       0    1       1
21629     0      0       0    2       0
share|improve this answer
    
mabye add to cookbook these types of recipes –  Jeff Aug 22 '13 at 14:04
    
Hey Andy, thanks - I am going to use the lists against each ID as a table to index in a search engine - hence wanted the lists of keywords against each ID –  user7289 Aug 22 '13 at 17:39

Here's another way; Though @Andy's a bit more intuitve

In [24]: df.groupby('id').apply(
              lambda x: x['color'].value_counts()).unstack().fillna(0)
Out[24]: 
       blue  green  purple  red  yellow
id                                     
21627     1      1       1    2       0
21628     0      1       0    1       1
21629     0      0       0    2       0
share|improve this answer
    
That's not how you spell color :p, value_counts makes it more intuitive, but I think pivot_table is the way to do it. –  Andy Hayden Aug 22 '13 at 14:10
2  
I agree pivot_table is better; (this is basically what it does internally anyhow); I always though colour was a colloquial spelling (deprecated) :) –  Jeff Aug 22 '13 at 14:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.