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I would like to understand the logic behind what I am going to show you.
If I have a 'module.f90':

module def_dimens
integer :: dimens=4
end module def_dimens

a 'subr.f90':

subroutine sub(X)
integer :: X
integer :: S(1:X*5)
S=1
print*,S
end subroutine sub

and a 'main.f90':

program test
use def_dimens
call sub(dimens)
end program test

by compiling gfortran module.f90 subr.f90 main.f90 and running the result there isn't any problem.

But with 'main2.f90' given by

program test
use def_dimens
integer :: A(1:dimens*5)
A=1
print*,A
end program test

and compiling gfortran module.f90 main2.f90 I have an error, so I have to use an allocatable array:

program test
use def_dimens
integer,allocatable :: A(:)

allocate(A(1:dimens*5))
A=1
print*,A
end program test

or I have to specify 'dimens' in the module as a parameter (but this is not useful for me, because in cases more complicated than this I would need a variable whose value is fixed by calling another subroutine before using it).

So my question is: Why is there such a difference? Why does gfortran complain when it has to declare an array in the main program by using a variable to fix its size, and instead there isn't any problem in doing that in a subroutine?

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2 Answers 2

You cannot have a statically defined array with a variable that the compiler thinks is variable. The error code (had you printed it) is pretty clear:

Error: the module or main program array a at (1) must have constant shape

The compiler does not know that dimens is supposed to be constant. You can fix this by declaring dimens as a parameter:

module def_dimens
   integer, parameter :: dimens=4
end module
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You are saying things that are already pretty clear to me. For example (had you read better my question) I already state that putting parameter is a way to fix the problem. I asked why you can pass a variable to a subroutine which uses it to set the size of an array but you cannot do the same if you take it from the module without using a subroutine. I am asking if there is something related to the way the memory is used, for example, not just how to fix the problem, because I already know how to do that. –  Gippo Aug 22 '13 at 16:55
    
Then my first line answers your question: you cannot have a statically defined array with a variable parameter. As @VladimirF points out, the subroutine defines it is an automatic array, which is handled differently than the main program because it is a subroutine that depends on the values called (whereas the main has no called variables). –  Kyle Kanos Aug 22 '13 at 17:02
1  
@Gippo As to your memory comment, some compilers will put automatic arrays on the stack instead of the heap. Each array is either a "static" or "dynamic" array. Static arrays, as Kyle said, cannot be defined with a variable, because the compiler is too stupid to know it won't change. You have to tell it that it won't change. Automatic arrays (see Vladimir's answer) are a kind of dynamic array, which are allocated entering the subroutine and deallocated exiting the subroutine, hence you can use a variable parameter. –  SuperCow Aug 23 '13 at 16:42

To add to Kyle's answer, if you declare an array in a subroutine, which is not a dummy argument or it does not have the save attribute, it is an automatic array . It is allocated automatically each time when the subroutine starts to run. It is allocated according the value of the variables in the expression for it's shape. The values in the array are not preserved between calls.

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