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Cheers,

I know you can get the amount of combinations with the following formula (without repetition and order is not important):

// Choose r from n

n! / r!(n - r)!

However, I don't know how to implement this in C++, since for instance with

n = 52

n! = 8,0658175170943878571660636856404e+67

the number gets way too big even for unsigned __int64 (or unsigned long long). Is there some workaround to implement the formula without any third-party "bigint" -libraries?

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7 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Here's an ancient algorithm which is exact and doesn't overflow unless the result is to big for a long long

unsigned long long
choose(unsigned long long n, unsigned long long k) {
    if (k > n) {
        return 0;
    }
    unsigned long long r = 1;
    for (unsigned long long d = 1; d <= k; ++d) {
        r *= n--;
        r /= d;
    }
    return r;
}

This algorithm is also in Knuth's "The Art of Computer Programming, 3rd Edition, Volume 2: Seminumerical Algorithms" I think.

UPDATE: There's a small possibility that the algorithm will overflow on the line:

r *= n--;

for very large n. A naive upper bound is sqrt(std::numeric_limits<long long>::max()) which means an n less than rougly 4,000,000,000.

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Could this be improved by r *= (n--) / d, to do the divide first? –  GManNickG Dec 24 '09 at 17:59
1  
GManNickG, it seems to me that we would lose precision that way. –  Andres Riofrio May 14 '13 at 3:17
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From Andreas' answer:

Here's an ancient algorithm which is exact and doesn't overflow unless the result is to big for a long long

unsigned long long
choose(unsigned long long n, unsigned long long k) {
    if (k > n) {
        return 0;
    }
    unsigned long long r = 1;
    for (unsigned long long d = 1; d <= k; ++d) {
        r *= n--;
        r /= d;
    }
    return r;
}

This algorithm is also in Knuth's "The Art of Computer Programming, 3rd Edition, Volume 2: Seminumerical Algorithms" I think.

UPDATE: There's a small possibility that the algorithm will overflow on the line:

r *= n--;

for very large n. A naive upper bound is sqrt(std::numeric_limits<long long>::max()) which means an n less than rougly 4,000,000,000.

Consider n == 67 and k == 33. The above algorithm overflows with a 64 bit unsigned long long. And yet the correct answer is representable in 64 bits: 14,226,520,737,620,288,370. And the above algorithm is silent about its overflow, choose(67, 33) returns:

8,829,174,638,479,413

A believable but incorrect answer.

However the above algorithm can be slightly modified to never overflow as long as the final answer is representable.

The trick is in recognizing that at each iteration, the division r/d is exact. Temporarily rewriting:

r = r * n / d;
--n;

For this to be exact, it means if you expanded r, n and d into their prime factorizations, then one could easily cancel out d, and be left with a modified value for n, call it t, and then the computation of r is simply:

// compute t from r, n and d
r = r * t;
--n;

A fast and easy way to do this is to find the greatest common divisor of r and d, call it g:

unsigned long long g = gcd(r, d);
// now one can divide both r and d by g without truncation
r /= g;
unsigned long long d_temp = d / g;
--n;

Now we can do the same thing with d_temp and n (find the greatest common divisor). However since we know a-priori that r * n / d is exact, then we also know that gcd(d_temp, n) == d_temp, and therefore we don't need to compute it. So we can divide n by d_temp:

unsigned long long g = gcd(r, d);
// now one can divide both r and d by g without truncation
r /= g;
unsigned long long d_temp = d / g;
// now one can divide n by d/g without truncation
unsigned long long t = n / d_temp;
r = r * t;
--n;

Cleaning up:

unsigned long long
gcd(unsigned long long x, unsigned long long y)
{
    while (y != 0)
    {
        unsigned long long t = x % y;
        x = y;
        y = t;
    }
    return x;
}

unsigned long long
choose(unsigned long long n, unsigned long long k)
{
    if (k > n)
        throw std::invalid_argument("invalid argument in choose");
    unsigned long long r = 1;
    for (unsigned long long d = 1; d <= k; ++d, --n)
    {
        unsigned long long g = gcd(r, d);
        r /= g;
        unsigned long long t = n / (d / g);
        if (r > std::numeric_limits<unsigned long long>::max() / t)
           throw std::overflow_error("overflow in choose");
        r *= t;
    }
    return r;
}

Now you can compute choose(67, 33) without overflow. And if you try choose(68, 33), you'll get an exception instead of a wrong answer.

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Howard, I've fixed the messed-up formatting in your answer. Please read the edit hints to the right of the edit pane as to how to do this yourself. Oh, and very welcome to SO! –  sbi Jan 23 '11 at 19:37
    
@sbi he wanted to quote the accepted answer, which is why it looked a bit odd. In all fairness, the editor really sucks for some things imo. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 23 '11 at 19:43
    
@Johannes: Oh, I totally missed that! maybe a hint would be appropriate? –  sbi Jan 23 '11 at 23:30
    
Your edits are right on the mark, thanks much! I'm a newbie here and am still learning proper etiquette and editing. –  Howard Hinnant Jan 25 '11 at 23:50
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Remember that

n! / ( n - r )! = n * ( n - 1) * .. * (n - r + 1 )

so it's way smaller than n!. So the solution is to evaluate n* ( n - 1 ) * ... * ( n - r + 1) instead of first calculating n! and then dividing it .

Of course it all depends on the relative magnitude of n and r - if r is relatively big compared to n, then it still won't fit.

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Please note that the question is how to calculate n! / r!(n - r)! instead of n! / (n - r)!. –  wenqiang Jul 16 '13 at 4:24
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The following routine will compute the n-choose-k, using the recursive definition and memoization. The routine is extremely fast and accurate:

inline unsigned long long n_choose_k(const unsigned long long& n,
                                     const unsigned long long& k)
{
   if (n  < k) return 0;
   if (0 == n) return 0;
   if (0 == k) return 1;
   if (n == k) return 1;
   if (1 == k) return n;       
   typedef unsigned long long value_type;
   value_type* table = new value_type[static_cast<std::size_t>(n * n)];
   std::fill_n(table,n * n,0);
   class n_choose_k_impl
   {
   public:

      n_choose_k_impl(value_type* table,const value_type& dimension)
      : table_(table),
        dimension_(dimension)
      {}

      inline value_type& lookup(const value_type& n, const value_type& k)
      {
         return table_[dimension_ * n + k];
      }

      inline value_type compute(const value_type& n, const value_type& k)
      {
         if ((0 == k) || (k == n))
            return 1;
         value_type v1 = lookup(n - 1,k - 1);
         if (0 == v1)
            v1 = lookup(n - 1,k - 1) = compute(n - 1,k - 1);
         value_type v2 = lookup(n - 1,k);
         if (0 == v2)
            v2 = lookup(n - 1,k) = compute(n - 1,k);
         return v1 + v2;
      }

      value_type* table_;
      value_type dimension_;
   };
   value_type result = n_choose_k_impl(table,n).compute(n,k);
   delete [] table;
   return result;
}
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Well, I have to answer to my own question. I was reading about Pascal's triangle and by accident noticed that we can calculate the amount of combinations with it:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/cstdint.hpp>

boost::uint64_t Combinations(unsigned int n, unsigned int r)
{
    if (r > n)
        return 0;

    /** We can use Pascal's triange to determine the amount
      * of combinations. To calculate a single line:
      *
      * v(r) = (n - r) / r
      *
      * Since the triangle is symmetrical, we only need to calculate
      * until r -column.
      */

    boost::uint64_t v = n--;

    for (unsigned int i = 2; i < r + 1; ++i, --n)
        v = v * n / i;

    return v;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << Combinations(52, 5) << std::endl;
}
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Yup, this is exactly the same algorithm as I posted. Kudos for coming up with it yourself ;) –  Andreas Brinck Dec 3 '09 at 12:19
    
Well, I have my moments :) –  nhaa123 Dec 3 '09 at 12:32
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Simplify the formula first though. You don't wanna do long division.

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If you want to be 100% sure that no overflows occur so long as the final result is within the numeric limit, you can sum up Pascal's Triangle row-by-row:

for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
    for (int j=0; j<=i; j++) {
        if (j == 0) current_row[j] = 1;
        else current_row[j] = prev_row[j] + prev_row[j-1];
    }
    prev_row = current_row; // assume they are vectors
}
// result is now in current_row[r-1]

However, this algorithm is much slower than the multiplication one. So perhaps you could use multiplication to generate all the cases you know that are 'safe' and then use addition from there. (.. or you could just use a BigInt library).

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Please see the accepted answer or mine. –  nhaa123 Dec 3 '09 at 12:50
    
As Andreas has stated in his answer, overflow could occur during the multiplication by n--. It wouldn't happen here. –  int3 Dec 3 '09 at 12:55
    
But as you've stated you'd have to wait for the end of the universe for the answer from this algorithm ;) –  Andreas Brinck Dec 3 '09 at 13:48
    
This doesn't work for r = 0. Need to modify to return 1. –  nsw Apr 16 at 19:44
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