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Update:
My code works fine on most Hebrew page, but fails on 10% of them. I was unfortunate enough to start with two 'bad' ones.
Here's an example of a 'good' page: http://m.sport5.co.il/Pages/Article.aspx?articleId=154765,
and this is a 'bad' one: http://www.havoda.org.il/Web/Default.aspx.
I still need to deal with the bad ones, and I still don't know how...

Original question:
I'm using lxml.html to parse HTML, and extract only text (to be later used for text classification). I couldn't manage to properly deal with unicode (Hebrew text, in my case).

The tree elements don't seem to be encoded correctly:
When I look at element[i].text , where type(element[i].text) = UnicodeType, I see something like this: "u'\xd7\x9e\xd7\xa9\xd7\x94 \xd7\xa9\xd7\xa8\xd7\xaa (1955-1954)'", and this is not right - this entity cannot be encoded or decoded! (or I haven't found how...) Printing it brings, of course, something like this: "××©× ×©×¨×ª (1955-1954)", and that's not Hebrew...

A workable text string should look like:
1. u'\u05de\u05e9\u05d4 \u05e9\u05e8\u05ea (1955-1954)' - a proper unicode string; or:
2. '\xd7\x9e\xd7\xa9\xd7\x94 \xd7\xa9\xd7\xa8\xd7\xaa (1955-1954)' - unicode encoded into a regular text string; but not:
3. u'\xd7\x9e\xd7\xa9\xd7\x94 \xd7\xa9\xd7\xa8\xd7\xaa (1955-1954)' - a useless hybrid entity ('ascii' codec can't decode byte...)

What do I do to solve it? What am I doing wrong? Here's the code I'm using:

import lxml.html as lh
from types import *

f = urlopen(url)
html = f.read()
root = lh.fromstring(html)

all_elements = root.cssselect('*')
all_text = ''
for i in range(len(all_elements)):
  if all_elements[i].tag not in ['script','style']:
    if type(all_elements[i].text) in [StringType, UnicodeType]:
      all_text = all_text + all_elements[i].text.strip() + ' '

Everything works just fine with pure English (non unicode) html.

Almost all of the answers here refer to lxml.etree, and not lxml.html that I'm using. Do I have to switch? (I don't want to...)

share|improve this question
    
I would suggest using lxml.html.tostring(your_element, method="text", encoding=unicode), printing the output within [] in the console. If the output is OK, you've got your unicode text. If not, maybe the declared encoding in the HTML is wrong. In that case, you need to fix it when parsing, by passing an encoding='the-real-encoding' parameter to a parser instance that you give to lh.fromstring(html, parser=lxml.html.HTMLParser(encoding='the-real-encoding')) –  paul trmbrth Aug 22 '13 at 15:04
    
If you have a link to a sample HTML page you are working with, that would be helpful also –  paul trmbrth Aug 22 '13 at 15:29
1  
following @Steven's answer, try with lh.fromstring(html, parser=lxml.html.HTMLParser(encoding='utf8')) –  paul trmbrth Aug 22 '13 at 16:13
    
@pault. Here's the sample: havoda.org.il/Web/Default.aspx. It appears my code works on most Hebrew pages, like: m.sport5.co.il/Pages/Article.aspx?articleId=154765, but I still need to take care of these bad ones. I updated the question. (Thanks, and sorry for the delay in answer) –  AviM Oct 9 '13 at 15:42
    
The source of havoda.org.il/Web/Default.aspx looks like mostly blobs of JavaScript. I don't think you will get anything useful out of that page by parsing as HTML with lxml. Perhaps you can use something like Selenium or PhantomJS. –  mzjn Oct 9 '13 at 17:14

1 Answer 1

probably (but hard to know for sure without having the data), the page is UTF-8 encoded, but the HTML parser defaults to iso-8859-1 (as opposed to the XML parser which defaults to UTF-8)

share|improve this answer
    
indeed, u'מש' is u'\u05de\u05e9' (first 2 characters of sample text "1" in question) and encoded as UTF8 gives '\xd7\x9e\xd7\xa9' –  paul trmbrth Aug 22 '13 at 16:11
    
Here's the data: havoda.org.il/Web/Default.aspx. It appears my code works on most Hebrew pages, like: m.sport5.co.il/Pages/Article.aspx?articleId=154765, but I still need to take care of these bad ones. I updated the question. –  AviM Oct 9 '13 at 15:45

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