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I wonder why it is not possible to do the following:

struct TestStruct
{
    public readonly object TestField;
}

TestStruct ts = new TestStruct {
    /* TestField = "something" // Impossible */
};

Shouldn't the object initializer be able to set the value of the fields ?

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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Object Initializer internally uses a temporary object and then assign each value to the properties. Having a readonly field would break that.

Following

TestStruct ts = new TestStruct 
{
     TestField = "something";
};

Would translate into

TestStruct ts;
var tmp = new TestStruct();
tmp.TestField = "something"; //this is not possible
ts = tmp;

(Here is the answer from Jon Skeet explaining the usage of temporary object with object initalizer but with a different scenario)

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Where do you get this temporary object business? –  siride Aug 22 '13 at 15:54
    
I remember reading an answer from Jon Skeet about the object not getting disposed when initialized through object initializer. Let me find the link –  Habib Aug 22 '13 at 15:55
    
@siride, here stackoverflow.com/a/9753319/961113 –  Habib Aug 22 '13 at 15:56
1  
@siride, I don't think its irrelevant. ReadOnly fields should either be assigned a value in Constructor or with declaration. The reason it is not allowed in object initializer is that it internally uses a temporary object and then assign each property a value. This would break the simple C# concept of not assigning a read-only field before usage. –  Habib Aug 22 '13 at 16:08
2  
no, the real reason it isn't allowed is that the object is already constructed and once an object is constructed, no readonly fields can be changed. Note that even with temp objects, it's the temp object that is having its properties/fields set, so the problem clearly has nothing to do with temp objects. –  siride Aug 22 '13 at 17:20
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readonly means that the field can only be set in the constructor (or in a field initializer). Properties specified in the object initializer are set after the constructor has returned. That is,

TestStruct ts = new TestStruct {
    TestField = "something"
};

is basically equivalent to

TestStruct ts = new TestStruct();
ts.TestField = "something";

(In a Debug build, the compiler may use a temporary variable, but you get the idea.)

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Well, but your example is not exactly how it gets compiled check out my answer –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 22 '13 at 15:55
    
@SriramSakthivel: The C# specification defines an object initializer in terms of a temporary variable (hence the "basically equivalent" in my answer). However, in a Release build, the compiler is smart enough to elide the temporary variable. –  Michael Liu Aug 22 '13 at 16:01
    
This is the right answer. The rule is that you can't assign readonly fields after the object is constructed. This can readily be seen if you try to do the same thing with the regular syntax instead of the initializer. The temporary object is a red-herring. –  siride Aug 22 '13 at 19:47
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I wonder why it is not possible to do the following:

Because the compiler cannot know for sure that the following code will be executed:

TestStruct ts = new TestStruct 
{
    TestField = "something"
};

You should initialize readonly members directly inline or inside the constructor.

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From MSDN:

The readonly keyword is a modifier that you can use on fields. When a field declaration includes a readonly modifier, assignments to the fields introduced by the declaration can only occur as part of the declaration or in a constructor in the same class.

So it's simply not (yet) possible since object initializers are just post-creation assignments.

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This is not possible. since readonly fields cannot be assigned from other than Constructor or Field Initializer.

What you show is actually object initializer. It is just a syntatic sugar, gets comiled into something like this

TestStruct ts;
TestStruct ts1 = new TestStruct();
ts1.TestField = value;
ts = ts1;

Is that clear why it doesn't compile?

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Because object initializer is just a short way of initializing:

TestStruct ts = new TestStruct {
  TestField = "something";
};

is the same to (compiler will translate the above to this):

TestStruct ts = new TestStruct();
ts.TestField = "something";//this is of course not allowed.
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